Dollars Paid for Bird Viewing??

Maureen Ellis me2 at u.washington.edu
Thu Mar 7 16:09:22 PST 2002


Hello All,
When attending the recent Wintering Sparrows Workshop (WINGS, Inc. Jan,
2002, tour with Jon Dunn as leader) in Arizona, a $50 fee was volunteered
to a rancher who was somewhat reluctant to allow our small group on his
ranch roads to scan for Longspurs and Mt Plovers in the vast pastures.
The rancher was then very happy to allow us access as long as we followed
guidelines about driving only on the obvious roads, not disturbing the
livestock, and not going near any of the buildings. Given the large
numbers of birds and the easy rules, what a bargain. Mr. rancher now
realizes that he has a valuable asset to help supplement income. This
is important for birding groups and for the local economy as more and more
agricultural areas in AZ are being closed up to casual access by birders.
Something like this needs to occur in the Skagit and other prime birding
areas in WA where birders seem to be categorized as "vermin" by some of
the
locals.

And for anyone who has visited the Paton's yard in Pategonia, AZ,
there is a donation box for money to cover bird food; most people leave
$1 to $5, a bargain for the wonderful variety of hummingbirds,
passerines, doves, etc, that grace their marvelous yard. For those of you
who have never been there, these gracious people (Mr Paton passed on
recently; it is his widow&family keeping the resource going) set up
outside chairs and a sunscreen awning for visitors to be comfortable in
their yard while viewing the feeders. During my visit this year, both
the Common and the Ruddy Ground Doves were feeding side-by-side within 10
feet of me; the Ruddy was a lifer......what a great comparison!

Yes, it is a sensible, diplomatic strategy in this day and time to offer
to pay for the privilege of birding on private lands or simply polite to
bring along a donation of birdfood or a small gift to a homeowner with a
rare bird at the feeder. Yep, if I had a rare bird at my feeder, it'd
been a great opportunity to share with others, meet new people, and chat
to see what others are seeing where, but some folks are more shy or not so
social. A little courtesy and astute thoughtfulness can go a long way in
keeping most people acting "civilized."

Cheers, me2
****************************************
Maureen Ellis, PhD, Research Scientist
Toxicology Group at Roos 1, 284A
Lab/Office phone: 206-685-1938
Dept of Environmental Health, Mailstop 354695
School of Public Health and Community Medicine
University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195

E-Mail: me2 at u.washington.edu
****************************************
"Why are we now traveling into space? Why, indeed, did we trouble to look
past the next mountain? Our prime obligation to ourselves is to make the
unknown known. We are on a journey to keep an appointment with whatever
we are."_____Gene Roddenberry

On Thu, 7 Mar 2002, Franny Drobny wrote:


> Hi Tweets:

>

> This idea about leaving birdseed or money for bird viewing may not actually

> be such a bad idea for local landowners to consider.

>

> Franny Drobny

> Seattle, WA

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Privileged and confidential communication. If you are not the addressee, you may not read, copy, or distribute this email. If you receive this email in error, please advise us by return email and delete it from your system. Thank you.

>

>

>




More information about the Tweeters mailing list