Nisqually NWR 5/6/04

SCRBJAY at aol.com SCRBJAY at aol.com
Fri May 7 09:40:15 PDT 2004


Tweets,

Another great day at Nisqually yesterday! The day started clear & cool and
got better as we went along. This dry weather we are having has really taken its
toll on the seasonal pond at Nisqually. The ponds along the trail to
McAllister Creek and behind the Twin Barns are just about gone. Hope today's rain
gives them a little water.

Water fowl numbers were down as might be expected, but both BLUE-WINGED TEAL
and CINNAMON TEAL were present. The BLUE-WINGED TEAL were seen in the canal to
the left as you pass the first wetland on the way to McAllister Creek and the
CINNAMON TEAL were on the pond to the right. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was in
the willows at the end of the ponds.

A SORA was heard near the willows on the right near the middle of the pond
and an AMERICAN BITTERN flew across that pond toward the Twin Barns. A
PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER was in the willows out near McAllister Creek and there were a
couple of GREATER YELLOWLEGS off to the right where a marsh was a couple of
weeks ago, just before the slough near McAllister Creek. A BITTERN was also
sighted from the Twin Barns observation deck, and a couple of BAND-TAILED PIGEONS
flew over at this location.

During our return from McAllister Creek we sighted some shorebirds on the
pond closest to the parking lot that included DUNLIN, WESTERN SANDPIPERS, LEAST
SANDPIPERS, and a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. AMERICAN PIPITS were on the other
side of the trail.

The highlight of the day was the woods between the Nisqually River overlook
and the Ring Dike. Here we saw a flock of CEDAR WAXWING, a SWAINSON'S THRUSH,
several YELLOW WARBLERS, some WESTERN TANAGERS, and a DOWNEY WOODPECKER. We
also had BUSHTITS in the same area and saw a PILIATED WOODPECKER on our return
from the Ring Dike.

Total species for the day were 55, with seven new species for the year for a
total of 98. New for the year were: SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER, BAND-TAILED
PIGEON, PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, CEDAR WAXWING, YELLOW WARBLER,
and WESTERN TANAGER.


Phil Kelley
Lacey, WA
360-459-1499
scrbjay at aol.com

"We were few and they were plenty. Now we are plenty and they
are few."
Confucius


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