[Tweeters] Re: Black-crowned night heron

Steve & Susan Bennett slb at whidbey.com
Tue Apr 19 16:23:48 PDT 2005


We went to the pond at Dugualla Bay today and watched the heron for quite a 
while.  We have seen them in Florida and at the Potholes in eastern WA, but 
they are not on Whidbey Audubon's bird list - till now! This was the first 
time we acted on a tip from tweeters and we are delighted!
----- Original Message ----- 
From: <tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu>
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2005 12:00 PM
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 8, Issue 19


Send Tweeters mailing list submissions to
tweeters at u.washington.edu

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu

You can reach the person managing the list at
tweeters-owner at mailman1.u.washington.edu

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of Tweeters digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Adams & Grant Co's, WA (Hill)
   2. Townsend's Solitaire in Seattle (David Flood)
   3. Sequim Mountain Bluebirds (Russell Rogers)
   4. Kent Ross's Geese - yes (Michael Hobbs)
   5. Nisqually NWR 4/17/05 (Scrubjay323 at aol.com)
   6. Re: Kent Ross's Geese - yes (Aaron Martin)
   7. Hybrid Goose (MurrayH at aol.com)
   8. Today on the Clear Creek Trail (MaryK)
   9. Birding Trip Report: Ridgefield NWR River S Unit, Clark
      County, Washington on April 17, 2005 (scottbmurray at msn.com)
  10. You never know! (mike denny)
  11. Willapa report (WA). (Jeff Gilligan)
  12. Ross's Geese & Western Tanager (Flores)
  13. Lake Stevens arrivals:  Hammond's+ (Scott Atkinson)
  14. Re: radios (Joemeche at aol.com)
  15. ospreys in E. Grays Harbor (Carol Ann Boyer)
  16. Gorge Birding 4/16/05 (Wilson E Cady)
  17. Grant County Lesser Black-backed/migrants (Doug Schonewald)
  18. Cascadia Hummingbird Report - 04/18/2005 (Mike Patterson)
  19. BLUE JAYS (mike denny)
  20. Fw: Baikal Teal - Sunday, 17 April (Michael Hobbs)
  21. (no subject) (Steve Taylor)
  22. Blk-crwn Night Heron Whidbey (Steve Ellis)
  23. A Stroll Through Juanita Park - 4-17-2005 (Desilvis, Denis J)
  24. Deception pass auklets (Ali Chaney)
  25. Ross' Geese on Monday AM (B & P Bell)
  26. Vancouver, BC RBA for April 17, 2005 (Wayne C. Weber)
  27. Brant at Discovery Park on Saturday (Kevin T. Moore)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 12:03:51 -0700
From: "Hill" <hill at smwireless.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Adams & Grant Co's, WA
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.Washington.edu>, "Inland Birds"
<inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu>
Message-ID: <003501c54380$32065d80$4700000a at Hill>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

While Bob was out looking for migrants this morning, I was trying to get 
caught up at home.  A few interesting observations included a male Cassin's 
Finch and a Brewer's Sparrow, an assumed resident pair of Red-breasted 
Nuthatches, two "Audubon's" Warblers, and lots of White-crowned Sparrows at 
my feeders.  I also heard several flocks of Sandhill Cranes flying over 
town.

Favorable weather might move a few cranes north today.  Yesterday the cranes 
were foraging early in the corn at Corfu, with a couple thousand arriving by 
4 pm (also when we drove by at 08:45).  The flock included at least 100 
Greater Sandhill Cranes, which seem to pass through toward the end of the 
spring migration period in mid-April.  I'd love to know where those Greaters 
wind up nesting.

Randy Hill
Othello
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Bob Flores
  To: Tweeters ; Inland Birds
  Sent: Sunday, April 17, 2005 11:07 AM
  Subject: [inland-NW-birders]Corfu Woods, Para Ponds, McCain's Potato 
Ponds, Adams & Grant Co's, WA


  I birded Corfu Woods this morning highlights include; 4 Nashville 
warblers, 2 orange-crowned warblers, 1 yellow-rumped warbler.  Alot of 
ruby-crowned kinglets and white-crowned sparrows.  3 Lincoln's sparrow, 2 
sharp-shinned hawks, two great horned owls and 2 Swainson's hawk.

  At Para Ponds I found that first of the year cinnamon teal (thanks to Mike 
Denny who found one here last night) and 8 great egrets, 31 dunlin.

  McCain's Potato Ponds had 4 cinnamon teal and 1 blue-winged teal (sorry 
Mike it was just over the dike)

  PS- At Corfu, Rd C se, when I arrived at 0700hrs there were about 10,000 
cranes and about 20,000 canada and cakling geese.

  Good birding

  Bob Flores
  Othello, WA
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050417/a2e31b83/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 12:31:08 -0700
From: "David Flood" <floodtax at earthlink.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Townsend's Solitaire in Seattle
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <000001c54384$05887460$6d25f304 at D9CQ3411>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

On Wednesday, April 13th I spotted a Townsend's Solitaire on 18th Avenue at
the crest of Capitol Hill in Seattle. The eye ring was very bright but
otherwise the bird was quite dull and the wing markings were inconspicuous.
At one point it dropped down to the edge of a curb-side puddle in which
goldfinch and house sparrows were bathing giving me a very close view.

Sorry for this belated report - my excuse is that I own a tax business so I
was a tad preoccupied earlier in the week.

David Flood
Seattle





------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 14:32:47 -0700
From: Russell Rogers <rrogers at olypen.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sequim Mountain Bluebirds
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <ba5b02933f71ea2a416e69b7d00872d9 at olypen.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

The 2 male and 1 female MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRDS were at the same location
again today at 11:30AM. As I was watching them, all three of them all
of the sudden took off up into the sky and headed west out of sight. As
the bluebirds left so did my luck being that my car would not start...

Russell
------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
--------------------------
Russell, Mary, Emily, Willie, and Paddy
219 South Second Ave
Sequim WA 98382
(360) 582-3781
------------------------------------------------------------------------ 
--------------------------



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 14:48:21 -0700
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor at verizon.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Ross's Geese - yes
To: "Tweeters \(E-mail\)" <TWEETERS at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <002c01c54397$2d2b6af0$6601a8c0 at McCoury>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset=iso-8859-1;
reply-type=original

Tweets - I did a quick swing through the Kent Valley around mid-day today,
and easily found the 2 ROSS'S GEESE previously reported by Charlie Wright
They were with Cacklers at the Boeing Ponds.

I also stopped at the pond about 1/2 mile south of 277th on the West Valley
Hwy, where there were several (5+) GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 2 drake CINNAMON
TEAL, some dowitchers, and a MOURNING DOVE.

Duck numbers and duck diversity are still pretty good.  Swallows abound
(didn't see any rough-wings, though).

== Michael Hobbs
== Kirkland, WA
== http://www.scn.org/fomp/birding.htm
== birdmarymoor at verizon.net



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:15:32 EDT
From: Scrubjay323 at aol.com
Subject: [Tweeters] Nisqually NWR 4/17/05
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <145.43c09737.2f945624 at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Tweets,

My wife and I took a quick run down to Nisqually this afternoon so I  could
show her the GREAT HORNED OWLETS. As we started off toward the twin barns  a
woman asked if we had just gotten there. When I said yes she said there  was 
a
BARN OWL in a hole in a tree on the other side of the visitor center.  Quick
change of plans. Off we went in that direction. Heading out toward the
Nisqually River, just past the laurel bushes, was Bob Young, one of the 
other
volunteers at Nisqually. He graciously pointed out the BARN OWL to us.

Here's the deal: just past the laurels, off to the left is an old, straight
snag. Look past it on the left and you will see another dead tree 100 
hundred
yards or so off the trail. Look at the hole in this snag about 25 feet off
the  ground. Sitting in there was a female (I think) BARN OWL. First BARN 
OWL
I've  seen at Nisqually in some time.

Later we found an adult GREAT HORNED OWL and owlet in the woods behind the
nest tree. Not nearly as easy as when they were sitting in the nest tree, 
but
they are still in the area.

The BARN OWL makes 98 species for the year at Nisqually, and both birds 
were
life birds for my wife.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to got make diner.

Phil  Kelley
Lacey, WA
360-459-1499
scrubjay323 at aol.com

"We were few  and they were many. Now we are many and they are  few."
Confucius

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050417/e7cbc6c5/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 17:43:21 -0700
From: Aaron Martin <aamartin at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Kent Ross's Geese - yes
To: "Tweeters (E-mail)" <TWEETERS at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <a65d92cc050417174329579131 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Tweets,

Fred Parent and I went down to the field just north of Frager Road
where Charlie Wright first spotted the two Ross's Geese.  The field
was empty so we drove around the industrial parks before coming to a
large pond to the south on S 199th (Boeing Ponds?).  As we drove up a
large number of geese were flushed by a Bald Eagle including two
obviously different geese.  We tracked them for several minutes before
they landed to the north.  Driving back up Frager Road we spotted them
in a large field on the east side of the road a few hundred yards
north of the original location.  There was a large gravel parking lot
with a wooden sign that says "Tukwila."  The geese were on the far
north-east side of the field.  With them were Canda, Cackling and
Greater White-Fronted Geese, 4 different geese in one spot!  Thanks
for the keen eye Charlie.

Another neat sighting was in the field just to the south east of
S200th where we observed several Am. Pipits and about 4 adult and 3
newborn Killdeer running around.  When we left the car we were saw the
broken wing display.

Good Birding.

Aaron Martin
Seattle, WA

On 4/17/05, Michael Hobbs <birdmarymoor at verizon.net> wrote:
> Tweets - I did a quick swing through the Kent Valley around mid-day today,
> and easily found the 2 ROSS'S GEESE previously reported by Charlie Wright.
> They were with Cacklers at the Boeing Ponds.
>
> I also stopped at the pond about 1/2 mile south of 277th on the West 
> Valley
> Hwy, where there were several (5+) GREATER YELLOWLEGS, 2 drake CINNAMON
> TEAL, some dowitchers, and a MOURNING DOVE.
>
> Duck numbers and duck diversity are still pretty good.  Swallows abound
> (didn't see any rough-wings, though).
>
> == Michael Hobbs
> == Kirkland, WA
> == http://www.scn.org/fomp/birding.htm
> == birdmarymoor at verizon.net
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters at u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


-- 
/\aron


------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 21:32:22 EDT
From: MurrayH at aol.com
Subject: [Tweeters] Hybrid Goose
To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <14.436e61c0.2f946826 at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


On April 13, at the UW Research ponds, there was a medium sized Canada
Goose, medium brown in color, very quietly preening on a small pond: the 
"normal"
white area (don't really know the proper term for the white cheek  of the
Canada) was reduced to a  round spot just behind and below the  eye, and 
the dark
bill had a white spot at the base.  Found a  look-alike in Sibley, p. 77: a
hybrid Greater White-fronted x Canada  Goose.  Any other possibles?  Other
sightings?         All help  appreciated.     Murray

(Mrs.) Murray Hansen
Graham, WA
_MurrayH at aol.com_ (mailto:MurrayH at aol.com)
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050417/43530806/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 19:19:07 -0700
From: "MaryK" <CelloBird at seanet.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Today on the Clear Creek Trail
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <200504180219.j3I2IsQZ052994 at milkyway.seanet.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The trail is in Silverdale, Kitsap County.

I spent an enjoyable 60 min or so just soaking in the birdsong and taking a
nice walk, not really birding, but...   In tax. order, more or less:

Canada Goose
Am Wigeon
Green-winged Teal
Barrow's Goldeneye (lone pair)
Red-breasted Merganser (ditto)
Bald Eagle (juv)
Dowitcher sp. (I think, didn't get a great look)
Rufous Hummer - doing a courtship display!
Belted Kingfisher
Northern Flicker
Pileated Woodpecker (industriously drilling into a snag)
Steller's Jay
Am Crow
Black-capped Chickadee
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Am Robin
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler (both forms)
Spotted Towhee
Song Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Redwing Blackbird
House Finch
Pine Siskin

Birds of the Day were the RUHU and PIWO.

Good Birding,
Mary

Mary Klein
Bremerton WA
CelloBird at seanet.com




------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 19:54:28 GMT
From: scottbmurray at msn.com
Subject: [Tweeters] Birding Trip Report: Ridgefield NWR River S Unit,
Clark County, Washington on April 17, 2005
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <200504180316.j3I3Gpw16169 at tonkinese.furfly.net>

This report was mailed for Scott Murray by http://birdnotes.net

Date: April 17, 2005
Location: Ridgefield NWR River S Unit, Clark County, Washington

Temperature: 50 degrees fahrenheit
Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 90%
Precipitation: showers/intermittent rain

1.Black-necked Stilt was located between South Quigley lake
and Ruddy lake in the mud flats.

Birds seen (in taxonomic order):

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Green-Winged Teal
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Pied-billed Grebe
American Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
American Coot
Killdeer
Black-necked Stilt [1]
Greater Yellowlegs
Lesser Yellowlegs
Common Snipe
Rock Dove
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Northern Flicker
Western Wood-Pewee
American Crow
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Black-capped Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Marsh Wren
American Robin
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Brewer's Blackbird
American Goldfinch

Footnotes:

[1]  1. located between South Quigley lake and
     Ruddy lake in mud flats.

Total number of species seen: 54




------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:19:26 -0700
From: "mike denny" <m.denny at charter.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] You never know!
To: "tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, "Inland NW Birders"
<inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu>
Message-ID: <002301c543c5$6d342780$0886bd44 at BLACKBIRD>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
reply-type=original

Hello All,
This afternoon while riding/driving up the west face of Jasper Mountain in
eastern Walla Walla County a pheasant ventured out onto the gravel road. It
seemed odd to see a pheasant of any species at this location. So stopping,
we scrutinized this bird. It was not a Ring-necked Pheasant, but something
else. Given all the introduced gamebird species that WDF&W has attempted to
release over the years, I would not be surprised to even see an Ostrich.
However this pheasant was an unknown to me. So I took three photos and upon
returning home sent one off to Ken Knittle who IDed this bird as a female
Reeve's Pheasant. So check out all those pheasants, you never know!
Later Mike
********************************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
1354 S. E. Central Ave.
College Place, WA  99324
509.529.0080 (h)

IF YOU HAVEN'T BEEN BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED!
*******************************************************************




------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 21:26:59 -0700
From: Jeff Gilligan <jeffgill at teleport.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Willapa report (WA).
To: OBOL <OBOL at lists.orst.edu>, Tweeters <TWEETERS at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BE888523.ADF5%jeffgill at teleport.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

I had a bit of time to bird, although my main purpose of the trip was to
deal with a burlary at my place on the bay... (They got my favorite carved
wooden duck.)

The shorebird migration is showing signs of picking up.

April 17:

Ledbetter (the shore from the parking lot to the marshes going north).
    160 Short-billed Dowitchers
    250 Dunlin
    20 Least Sandppers
    35 Western Sandpipers
    3 Black-bellied Plovers
    4 Greater Yellowlegs
    1 Merlin

>From my back yard further south on the bay:
    4,000 Dunlin
    375 Short-billed Dowichers
    200 Western Sandpipers
    1 Red Knot
    28 Greater Yellowlegs
    125 Least Sandpipers
    1 Black Turnstone
    11 Black-bellied Turnstones
    1 Osprey
    350 Black Brant
    70 Common Loons
    1 Saw-whet Owl

Orange-crowned Warblers and Black-throated Gray Warblers were singing in
many locations.

Jeff Gilligan.




------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:48:02 -0700
From: "Flores" <floresnw at gte.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ross's Geese & Western Tanager
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <LHEEICOGBIEJNAELOEKDMEANCOAA.floresnw at gte.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=Windows-1252

My husband and I spent the early evening/late afternoon driving around the
Kent Ponds/277th Street area, finding the Ross's Geese on Frager Rd as Aaron
Martin described.  We also had American Pipits and a Mourning Dove along
216th; and dowitchers, Greater Yellowlegs, and the Cinnamon Teal that
Michael Hobbs reported in the pond south of 277th & West Valley Hwy.

On top of all the other great birds, we were surprised to find a male
WESTERN TANAGER, on the road up above the fields that the Baikal Teal is
being seen in.  A very productive couple of hours in Kent!

Thanks,
Paula Flores
Sammamish, WA
floresnw at gte.net





------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 20:50:48 -0700
From: "Scott Atkinson" <scottratkinson at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Lake Stevens arrivals:  Hammond's+
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY102-F21A7813E2AC525CD71CF10C9290 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Tweeters:

I found several first-of-season arrivals on a walk this morn around Tiny's
Land (our place in n. Lake Stevens).  Highlights of 30 species present in
heavy forest and edge included a first HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER of the season,
an active, calling bird in company of another first of season, a
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER.  Also my first this spring was a flyover
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD.

The Hammond's eclipsed the previous earliest here by a day, but was still
several days short of my earliest back in the 80s, an April 13 bird at UW
I kind of expected to run into a Pacific-slope also today like the
Sullivans, especially since there have been something like 6-7 exceptionally
early reports since mid-March (!) from coastal BC sites, although until the
Sullivans' I'm not aware of any reports for WA, which seems odd, I haven't
checked on OR but I don't believe they had any until the last week either
The warbler, meanwhile, was right on schedule here, but was later than a
Victoria, BC bird (April 13) and the Sullivans' on April 15.

Also present at our place today were 7 Rufous Hummingbirds (a high number
here), a number of lingering Varied Thrush, and 32 Red Crossbills.

Scott Atkinson
Lake Stevens
mail to:  scottratkinson at hotmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 00:18:36 EDT
From: Joemeche at aol.com
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] radios
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <199.3d5d7d12.2f948f1c at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Tw'ters,

Regarding recent postings concerning biding "equipment," I wonder if we're
losing touch with the point of the exercise? Radios, tape players, 
GPS......!
Doesn't anyone just go birding anymore? What happened to the relaxing,
rejuvenating pastime of watching birds? "Birdwatching" became "birding" and 
now we're
competing. We are, indeed, an interesting species.

I've been watching and enjoying birds for more than 55 years and I've never
felt the need to take along a radio or a tape player, and I usually know 
where
I am. Is this all a bit strange or am I just the odd duck? Of course, 
there's
the old adage: "To each his own." And lest I forget, "Different 
strokes....,"
etc.

I also wonder if there's a grant to do a study here, because the funny thing
is, I'm beginning to enjoy watching birders almost as much as watching 
birds.
Homo sapiens: what a diverse lot we are!

Enjoy,
Joe Meche
Bellingham, WA
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050418/89bf1f71/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 22:46:01 -0700
From: "Carol Ann Boyer" <the_6_bs at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] ospreys in E. Grays Harbor
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY101-F25BD9FB8ED9C2DB7B378DF91290 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Hello,
My husband and I took our spring osprey tour today and found several active
nests.
2 birds at S. Montesano boat launch
2 birds at Montesano exit
1 bird at Schafer Boom Road, Brady
1 bird at Chehalis Wildlife Refuge (Schouweiler Road)
1 bird at Elma-Gate Road south of Oakville ( GH PUD erected a nest platform
there March 12!)
2 birds at Vance Creek Park  (This nest had blown down last summer.  There
were no birds on our first pass through this afternoon, but two were sitting
on the bare snag on our return.  We were worried about this pair as they
have been documented at this site for over 25 years.)
No ospreys were spotted at the Sharon Grange or Malone nests.

It was also a good day for other raptors:  Am. kestrels, 6 bald eagles, many
northern harriers, and red tailed hawks.

In our "front yard" we have continued to see a common snipe every day in the
same spot near our house, and an Am. bittern in the mornings.  The yellow
headed blackbird has continued to visit our feeder daily, and is quite
aggressive, frightening off the red wings and the scrub jays.

Carol Boyer
Brady




------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Sun, 17 Apr 2005 23:03:21 -0700
From: Wilson E Cady <gorgebirds at juno.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Gorge Birding 4/16/05
To: Johnstonstuartf at hotmail.com, tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <20050417.230322.-637305.0.gorgebirds at juno.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

         A group of Vancouver Audubon members joined me for a trip up the
Gorge into Skamania and Klickitat Counties.

Skamania County:
At the mouth of the Little White Salmon River there were three HORNED
GREBES in breeding plumage and at Rock Creek Park in Stevenson we had two
GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE.

Klickitat County:
        Seven TURKEY VULTURES were soaring over Balch Road.
At Major Creek we found one PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER and one NASHVILLE
WARBLER.
        At the Balch Road Cemetery we found A HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER and
two CHIPPING SPARROWS and a little further down the road past Balch lake
we found another two NASHVILLE WARBLERS.
        At the mouth of the Klickitat River two CASPIAN TERNS were
sitting on a sandbar.

Wilson Cady
N45  35.618'   W122  13.738'
Washougal, Skamania County,  WA
mail to: gorgebirds at juno.com


------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 05:45:37 -0700
From: "Doug Schonewald" <dschone8 at donobi.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Grant County Lesser Black-backed/migrants
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <LMEOKEGIHCKCABIHDIONMEFODAAA.dschone8 at donobi.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hi Tweets,

The 2 cy Lesser Black-backed Gull was relocated yesterday at the far south
end of Lake Lenore (take the small dirt track to the south of the large
basalt monolith on the west side of the road). Also present at this location
was a Peregrine Falcon.
A small dirt track east of the first boat launch on Lake Lenore produced a
fine group of shrub-steppe breeding birds. We were able to observe Brewer's,
Vesper, Sage, and Savannah Sparrows as well as two Loggerhead Shrikes.
Many Sandhill Cranes called from the sky as they continue their migration
northward. Also located while scanning the skies for cranes were nearly 100
American White Pelicans.
Blue Lake held a good number of Common Loons. We observed at least 24,
though the birds were diving and feeding heavily and there could have been a
few more or less.
Sun Lakes State Park produced a good variety of migrants. Ruby-crowned
Kinglets and Yellow-rumped Warblers (Audubon's) were in abundance. We also
observed several Nashville and Orange-crowned Warblers, good numbers of all
swallows, and many White-throated Swifts.
The Coulee City Park offered very close comparison views of Horned and
Eared Grebes.
Brook Lake (along SR-28, see Delorme pg. 69, A/6.5) held a huge flock of
Dunlin, 31 American White Pelicans, many Black-necked Stilts, and a single
Gray Partridge.

Cheers

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA
dschone8 at donobi.net
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.9.15 - Release Date: 4/16/2005




------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 07:37:57 -0700
From: Mike Patterson <celata at pacifier.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cascadia Hummingbird Report - 04/18/2005
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <4263C640.87813FD9 at pacifier.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Cascadia Hummingbird Report - 04/18/2005

Eastside Rufous Hummingbird reports are still running slow, which
is not that surprising cooler than average and very unsettled weather.
We did receive two reports east of 120°.  One from Oliver, BC and
another of a female in Lewiston, ID.  Reports of females arriving
ahead of males are unusual, but seem to occur more frequently in
years when the migration is delayed.

Tofino, BC      04-10-2005 100 49.1167 125.8833
Oliver, BC      04-11-2005 101 49.1833 119.5500
Auke Bay, BC    04-11-2005 101 58.3608 134.6431
Juneau, AK      04-13-2005 103 58.3886 134.1334
Juneau, AK      04-12-2005 103 58.3886 134.1334
Lewiston, ID    04-16-2005 106 46.3929 116.9922

In other hummingbird news, CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRDS were reported
at multiple locations from east of the Cascades in Oregon, in
British Columbia and in Idaho.  There was at least on report from
the Willamette Valley last week.

For more information on tracking Rufous Hummingbirds see:
http://home.pacifier.com/~neawanna/humm/count.html

-- 
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
celata at pacifier.com

If you want to end war and stuff, you've got to sing loud
                                            - Arlo Guthrie


------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 08:52:27 -0700
From: "mike denny" <m.denny at charter.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] BLUE JAYS
To: "tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, "Inland NW Birders"
<inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu>
Message-ID: <000801c5442e$9f563aa0$0886bd44 at BLACKBIRD>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
reply-type=original

Hello All,
This morning we checked a site where we located two BLUE JAYS several days
ago. These birds appear to be holding territory and were once again at the
junction of North College Ave. and Wallula Drive here in College Place. It
is my suspicion that these two may nest here. We will keep watching. This
species has nested to the north of Waitsburg in Columbia County in 1990.
Later Mike

********************************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
1354 S. E. Central Ave.
College Place, WA  99324
509.529.0080 (h)

IF YOU HAVEN'T BEEN BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED!
*******************************************************************




------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 09:33:58 -0700
From: "Michael Hobbs" <birdmarymoor at verizon.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fw: Baikal Teal - Sunday, 17 April
To: "Tweeters \(E-mail\)" <TWEETERS at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <01ed01c54434$6c29bcf0$6601a8c0 at McCoury>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset=iso-8859-1;
reply-type=response

Tweets - passing on this note from Tom Love:

== Michael Hobbs
== Kirkland, WA
== http://www.scn.org/fomp/birding.htm
== birdmarymoor at verizon.net

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Thomas Love" <tlove at linfield.edu>
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2005 9:33 AM
Subject: Baikal Teal - Sunday, 17 April


>I did not see anyone posting on the Baikal Teak from yesterday, Sunday, 17
>April.  Could you please forward to Tweeters that many observers, from BC,
>WA and OR, had great looks at the male Baikal Teal early afternoon Sunday
>from the overlook spot on 272nd.  It was in the smaller, nearer pond coming
>in and out of the grassy tussocks, back (east) of the dark brown house.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Tom Love
> tlove at linfield.edu
>



------------------------------

Message: 21
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 09:49:58 -0700
From: "Steve Taylor" <leftee at qwest.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] (no subject)
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <NBBBJANENOLELBLIPGIFEEEMEKAA.leftee at qwest.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

We recently took our annual trip to see the Sandhill Crane Migration.  I got
some pretty good pictures of several species including a couple that have
been very elusive (photographically speaking).

I've put a few of the better ones up on the web for those that would like to
see them at:

http://www.sparkmeister.com/birdlist/

At the bottom of the list of bird names is one called "April 9-11 '05" with
links to all the new pictures.

 We also 'discovered' an interesting little creature that is relatively rare
(only lives in a few counties in Wa. and Or.) and is only visible above
ground for a month or so each spring.  There is a picture of one of these
critters under the link "Not A Bird" - actual size is approximately 6 inches
including the tail.

Enjoy!

Steve Taylor
Bellingham
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050418/39cec8e8/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 22
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 09:52:32 -0700
From: Steve Ellis <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Blk-crwn Night Heron Whidbey
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BE8933E0.3BEC%sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

A Black-crowned Night Heron was reported yesterday ( Sunday) at Dugualla Bay
Lake on Whidbey Island.  Over the years we've had 3 or 4 sightings of these
birds on Whidbey.  Have any of you in Tweeter Land ever seen one here?
Documentation ( date and location) would be most helpful as we work toward
updating our checklist. Thanks!
Steve Ellis
Coupeville, Wa
sellis at coup.wednet.edu


------------------------------

Message: 23
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 10:03:22 -0700
From: "Desilvis, Denis J" <denis.j.desilvis at boeing.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] A Stroll Through Juanita Park - 4-17-2005
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Cc: "Woods, Roxie J" <roxie.j.woods at boeing.com>
Message-ID:
<22E9EED25022A84BA9589F1DECFE635F01350FDF at XCH-NW-26.nw.nos.boeing.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Tweeters,
My wife and I took a stroll through Juanita Park (Kirkland, WA) late on
a rain-sprinkled Sunday morning just to see what we could see. Lots of
Virginia Rails calling on the east side of the "throughway" and a couple
near the westside boardwalk, but didn't see any. Nice views of a Wood
Duck pair (Ilon Logan was taking some photos). A small flock of
Golden-crowned Sparrows were very approachable toward the west-side
blackberry vines. Most enjoyable sighting: Green-winged Teal, Cinnamon
Teal (my first for Kirkland), and Hooded Merganser about two feet apart,
paddling in a line. Most comical sighting: a Double-crested Cormorant
struggling to swallow a very large fish (perch?).

Birds or heard (26 spp) during this outing:

Canada Goose
Wood Duck
Mallard
Cinnamon Teal
Green-winged Teal
Lesser Scoup
Bufflehead
Hooded Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Virginia Rail (heard)
American Coot
Glaucous-winged Gull
Rock Pigeon
Downy Woodpecker (heard)
American Crow
Violet-green Swallow (many!)
Black-capped Chickadee
Bushtit
American Robin
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Song Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
House finch

May all your birds be identified,

Denis DeSilvis
Seattle, WA
mailto:denis.j.desilvis at boeing.com



------------------------------

Message: 24
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 10:07:44 -0700
From: "Ali Chaney" <achaney at heritage.nv.gov>
Subject: [Tweeters] Deception pass auklets
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Cc: Jennifer Newmark <jnewmark at heritage.nv.gov>
Message-ID: <EXCH-FEyDd3OJXsNQpt000134b0 at mail.state.nv.us>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1250"

Thanks all, for your responses to my auklet inquiry.  I guess I should have
been a little more clear in my ramblings.  We did see rhinoceros auklet,
with clearly defined double white plumes on its face.  There were quite a
few of these around.  However, it definitely wasn't the same as my little
mystery bird.  I recall an all black bird, bulbous bright orange bill
slightly upturned with a single white eyeline (plume?). Having looked at the
tufted puffin in the book, I don't recall any white on its face and the bill
didn't seem to be as large as a puffins bill.  I might just have to write
this one off, or head up to Alaska to get my eyes on a 'real' parakeet
auklet.  But, I certainly appreciate your responses.

Cheers.
Ali Chaney
Reno, NV



-- 
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.9.16 - Release Date: 2005-04-18

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050418/d1803ebe/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 25
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 10:28:04 -0700
From: "B & P Bell" <bellasoc at isomedia.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ross' Geese on Monday AM
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <00bc01c5443b$fa44cfa0$6400a8c0 at MCCOY>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Good Morning Tweets

The two Ross' Geese were present in the field on Frager Road just north of S 
200th St. at 8AM this morning. There were about 50 Cackling and Canada Geese 
and the Ross' stand out prominently. All the birds were feeding calmly when 
I left at 8:20. If you are coming from I-5 come down Orillia Rd and turn 
left (east) on S 200th St and then left (north) on Frager Rd. If coming west 
from SR167 on 212th, turn right on S200th and then left on Frager.

Most interesting to compare the three species of geese this morning. As 
Michael Hobbs told me last night, you can really seen the resemblance in 
head profile and bill size and shape between the Ross' and Cackling, 
noticeably different than for the Canadas. The Ross' are showing quite a bit 
of feather wear on their primaries and secondaries.

In a very brief drive-by on 277th there still lots of Northern Pintail, 
Green-winged Teal, Mallard, American Wigeon and some Cinnamon Teal in the 
ponds. Didn't have time to stay to see if the Baikal showed up.

Good Birding

Brian H. Bell
Woodinville WA
bellasoc at isomedia.com
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: 
https://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/private/tweeters/attachments/20050418/b81398af/attachment-0001.htm

------------------------------

Message: 26
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 10:34:25 -0700
From: "Wayne C. Weber" <contopus at telus.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Vancouver, BC RBA for April 17, 2005
To: "TWEETERS" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, "BCBIRDS"
<bcbirds at yahoogroups.com>
Message-ID: <025801c5443c$ddb54c60$6500a8c0 at bc.hsia.telus.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

This is the Vancouver Natural History Society's
Rare Bird Alert for Sunday, April 17, sponsored in part by the Wild
Birds Unlimited stores in Vancouver and North Vancouver. This
update was recorded at 10 AM, April 18. The RBA phone number
is (604) 737-3074.

RARE BIRD ALERT:  In Washington, a BAIKAL TEAL, an accidental
visitor from Asia, has been present since mid-December. For the last 2
weeks, from March 31 through April 16, it has been seen
on 277th Street near the West Valley Highway in Kent, just SE of
Seattle. For further details, please phone the Washington State RBA at
(206) 281-9172, or check the TWEETERS E-mail group.


Sightings for Sunday, April 17

A flood of reports was received today as birders emerged from
hibernation, and spring migration swung into high gear.

At the Maplewood Conservation Area in North Vancouver, the first-of-year
PURPLE MARTIN was seen. Other first-of-year reports included a
TOWNSEND'S WARBLER at Queen Elizabeth Park in Vancouver,
and BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLERS at QE Park, at Beach
Grove Park and near the Boundary Bay Airport in Delta, and on Elkview
Road near Ryder Lake in Chilliwack. CASPIAN TERNS were also
reported from 4 localities, including 9 over Clark Drive and East
Hastings in Vancouver, and singles at Iona I., at the Tsawwassen
ferry jetty in Delta, and near the Port Mann bridge in Surrey.

In Pitt Meadows, 18 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were still
on Neaves Road south of the North Alouette River, with 3 or 4 CACKLING
GEESE. Two SANDHILL CRANES were seen near the Swan-e-set
Golf Course, and at least 5 AMERICAN KESTRELS were seen
around Pitt Meadows, as were two TURKEY VULTURES.

At the Reifel Bird Sanctuary in Delta, highlights included 2
AMERICAN BITTERNS, 3 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE,
and 1500 remaining SNOW GEESE.

At Iona Island in Richmond were 4 CINNAMON TEAL and 3
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS.

Three TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRES were still at the University
of BC Botanical Gardens, as was a migrant HERMIT THRUSH.

20 RHINOCEROS AUKLETS, a high number, were seen from
the Tsawwassen ferry jetty in Delta.

In Chilliwack, a surprising BRANT was seen at Sardis Park; a
TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE, NASHVILLE WARBLER, and MOUNTAIN
CHICKADEE were seen in the 48100 block of Elkview Road; and
3 early LESSER YELLOWLEGS were seen with other shorebirds
and ducks, including 2 CINNAMON TEAL, along Chilliwack Central
Road near Prest Road.


Sightings for Saturday, April 16

A late SNOWY OWL was seen briefly in North Delta near 116th
Street and 94A Avenue.

At the Maplewood Conservation Area, a female MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD
was in the west salt marsh.

An AMERICAN BITTERN was heard "pumping" near the high tower in
Boundary Bay Regional Park, Delta.

At Iona Island, a LONG-BILLED CURLEW was reported on the flats
by one observer, and 6 CASPIAN TERNS, a YELLOW-HEADED
BLACKBIRD, and a CINNAMON TEAL were reported by another.

In Vancouver, 3 TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRES were still at the UBC
Botanical Garden, and a first-of-year HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER
was near Boundary Road and 49th Street.


Sightings for Friday, April 15

At Blackie Spit in Surrey, the wintering LONG-BILLED CURLEW was
still present, and one WESTERN MEADOWLARK was heard singing.


Sightings for Thursday, April 14

At Colony Farm, on the Port Coquitlam side, an early WILSON'S
WARBLER was seen. Also here were a late NORTHERN SHRIKE and
6 RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRDS.

A BARRED OWL was seen in Campbell Valley Regional Park,
Langley.

The LONG-BILLED CURLEW was still at Blackie Spit in Surrey,
near the mouth of the Nicomekl River.

In Delta, two MARBLED GODWITS and 15 SHORT-BILLED
DOWITCHERS were seen on the Boundary Bay mudflats off
the foot of 72nd Street, along with many other shorebirds.

At Jericho Park in Vancouver were 6 BONAPARTE'S GULLS.

Along 6th Avenue near Stevens Drive, in the Tsawwassen area of
Delta, a HUTTON'S VIREO was singing.


Sightings for Wednesday, April 13

A ROCK SANDPIPER was seen again at Lighthouse Marine Park in
Point Roberts, Washington, along with a BLACK OYSTERCATCHER
and up to 69 BLACK TURNSTONES.

At Ambleside Park in West Vancouver, a pair of GREEN HERONS
were seen on the small island in the duck pond.

At the Maplewood Conservation Area in North Vancouver were 4
OSPREYS, and 15 RING-NECKED DUCKS in the west pond.

In Pitt Meadows, 18 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were
still present in a field east of Neaves Road and south of the
North Alouette River.

A TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE was seen in the town centre of Whistler.


Sightings for Tuesday, April 12

Near the foot of 96th Street on Boundary Bay in Delta, 30 SHORT-
BILLED DOWITCHERS and 400 WESTERN SANDPIPERS, the
first reported this spring, were seen. Also there were 50 GREATER
YELLOWLEGS, 1000 BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS, and thousands
of DUNLIN.

At the Tsawwassen jetty in Delta, 4 MARBLED GODWITS and a
WILLET were seen.
At Boundary Bay Regional Park in Delta were 600 BRANT and 31
GREATER YELLOWLEGS. An EARED GREBE was present in the
marina at Point Roberts, Washington.

At the Maplewood Conservation Area in North Vancouver were a
female MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD on the west side, and a TOWNSEND'S
SOLITAIRE.

A HERMIT THRUSH was seen in a garden near 41st and Dunbar, Vancouver.

Two late COMMON REDPOLLS were seen near 202nd Street and 47A
Avenue in Langley.


Sightings for Monday, April 11

Two pairs of CINNAMON TEAL, the first reported this spring, were in
ditches on Sea Island, Richmond. At nearby Iona I. Were several
AMERICAN PIPITS.

A TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE was at Grant Narrows Regional Park at
the south end of Pitt Lake, and an AMERICAN KESTREL was still along
Thompson Road in Pitt Meadows.




If you have any questions about birds or birding in the
Vancouver area, please call Wayne at (604) 597-7201,
Viveka at 531-3401, or Larry at 465-1402. Thank you for
calling the Vancouver Rare Bird Alert, and good birding.


For further information about birding in the Vancouver area,
log onto the Vancouver Natural History Society's website at
http://www.naturalhistory.bc.ca/VNHS/


This message was recorded, transcribed and distributed
by Wayne Weber.

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus at telus.net



------------------------------

Message: 27
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2005 10:45:46 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Kevin T. Moore" <onewhitecandle at yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Brant at Discovery Park on Saturday
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <20050418174546.84031.qmail at web51901.mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

I was in in Discovery Park on Saturday and flock of 50
BRANT landed on the beach on the lee side of the
lighthouse.  I had gone down there that wintry April
morning in search of BONAPARTE'S GULLS.  I found two
Bonaparte's in a flock of about 100 MEW GULLS.  I
hadn't known they would be that much smaller than
mews.  There were also a couple hundred WESTERN GREBES
out on the water.

-Kevin Moore
Seattle, WA



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site!
http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/


------------------------------

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters at mailman1.u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

End of Tweeters Digest, Vol 8, Issue 19
*************************************** 



More information about the Tweeters mailing list