[Tweeters] Re: Ivory-billed photos?

Bob McCready bmccready at tnc.org
Sun Dec 25 21:23:58 PST 2005


I wanted to add to the Ivory-bill photo discussion that although it is true
that there are no photos from the search over the last nearly two years,
there is the fuzzy video of the alleged bird mentioned by Bruce Jones. You
can see this for yourself (although don't gets you hopes too high, it is
pretty rough) on the Cornel Lab of Ornithology website at
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/multimedia/videos. In addition and
arguably more credible evidence are several recordings captured by the
search team last year in January. You can hear the recordings also on the
Cornel Lab of Ornithology website at
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ivory/multimedia/sounds. I would add that as
noted by Bruce Jones, that there is a significant underway to get photos,
video footage, and recordings. Also as pointed out by Bruce, given the
incredibly difficult terrain where the bird has been seen (nearly 10 very
credible sightings by very credible people), it is by no means easy to get
the kind of evidence the growing numbers of doubters require. I know all of
us are eagerly awaiting "hard" evidence, I hope that we as a community
remain hopeful and patient. Thanks.


Bob McCready
Director, Prairie Wings
Bainbridge, WA 98110
206 780-1102 work
bmccready at tnc.org




-----Original Message-----
From: tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu]On Behalf Of
tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu
Sent: Saturday, December 24, 2005 12:00 PM
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 16, Issue 24


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Today's Topics:

1. RePenn Cove Scoters (Steve Ellis)
2. Ivory-billed photos? (Stewart Wechsler)
3. RE: Microtines (James Prudente)
4. Re: Ivory-billed photos? (fremontinn at aol.com)
5. Re: Re Scoter Numbers (Ruth and/or Patrick Sullivan)
6. RE: Microtenes? (Kelly Cassidy)
7. Columbia Co. Bohemians (mike denny)
8. Swarovski 80mm angled zoom scope (AT80) for sale (Kevin Li)
9. Bellingham CBC results (Dec 18, 2005) (Wayne C. Weber)
10. FW: WDFW establishes hotline to report dead or ill swans
(C. Anderson)
11. Re: Microtenes? (Scott R a y)
12. Snowy Owls Still Around (Mac Knight)
13. Re: FW: WDFW establishes hotline to report dead or ill swans
(Diane Weinstein)
14. Today's owl pellet exam (Mike Patterson)
15. RE: Microtenes? (Kelly Cassidy)
16. Re: Microtenes? (Hal Opperman)
17. Re: Snowy Owls Still Around (Brett Wolfe)
18. Re: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls Still Around
(mac_knight at charter.net)
19. banded Song Sparrow in Discovery Park (Kevin T. Moore)
20. Re Lead Shot (Steve Ellis)
21. Re: Microtenes? (Ron McCluskey)
22. Re: Re Lead Shot (Jeff Kozma)
23. Banded Brandt's Cormorant (Dougnpip at aol.com)
24. Enumclaw Snowy Owl (Jeff Antonelis-Lapp)
25. Happy Holidays (Ian Paulsen)
26. No Edmonds Snowy Owl (Carol Riddell)
27. Red Phalarope in South Sound (bill shelmerdine)
28. Vancouver, BC RBA for December 23, 2005 (Wayne C. Weber)
29. Cashmere area birds (Lee Cain)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 13:02:55 -0700
From: Steve Ellis <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] RePenn Cove Scoters
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BFD1A5FF.605F%sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Usually we see hundreds of Surf Scoters with occasional views of 1- 2,000.
White-winged Scoters used to number around 2,000 until the mussel farmers
changed their practices to exclude them from gobbling up their "crop".
Black Scoters seem to be less predictable from year to year.
Steve Ellis
Coupeville, Wa
sellis at coup.wednet.edu


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 12:17:19 -0800
From: "Stewart Wechsler" <ecostewart at quidnunc.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ivory-billed photos?
To: "Michael Donahue" <mgd at u.washington.edu>, "Tweeters"
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <AGEIJPEMDDOJMBMMOILKMEKCDIAA.ecostewart at quidnunc.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1250"


My question is: when is someone going to release a decent current photo of
an Ivory Billed? As time goes by with no more than that crappy fuzzy video
doubt starts to creep. If the Ivory Billeds are indeed there (and I still
lean toward believing they are) why hasn't someone posted a good photo yet?
Will that be our Christmas present?

Stewart Wechsler
West Seattle
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.5/212 - Release Date: 12/23/2005



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 14:41:09 -0700
From: "James Prudente" <silverbowff at comcast.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] RE: Microtines
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <006f01c60809$96f27dc0$8a01050a at Traaveler>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Microtines are Voles of the Genus Microtus of which there are at least
15 species in North America. Those most likely found in the Washington
State are the Meadow Vole , M. pennsylvanicus, Mountain Vole, M.
montanus, Townsend Vole, M. townsendi, Longtail Vole, M. longicaudus,
Oregon Vole, M. oregoni, Richardson Vole, M. richardsoni . There are
other voles not of the Genus Microtus that are generically called
Microtines as well. All are readily eaten by a large number of birds
including raptor, gulls, herons, and shrikes.

Regards,

Jim Prudente
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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 16:54:02 -0500
From: fremontinn at aol.com
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Ivory-billed photos?
To: ecostewart at quidnunc.net, mgd at u.washington.edu,
tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <8C7D622854D5BC6-CF0-6FD1 at mblk-r31.sysops.aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Stewart and All,

Nobody has one! Last month, my wife and I spent several days searching the
Big Woods for ourselves. We have some understanding of the enormity of the
task. We also MAY have seen The Bird but we'll never know as it was only a
glimpse of a large, long, black bird flying in a beeline away and to the
right through the maze of tupelos and cypress. Lots of woodpeckers
includinh many Pileateds and this one mystery bird.

David Luneau, who shot the blurry video, told us he is trying very hard to
get a photo, along with a lot of Cornell people and others. By the way, a
Nova crew was shooting video for a PBS show to air Jan 10. Maybe part of my
interview will make the show!

Bruce Jones
Shoreline, WA and Wilmington, NC
fremontinn at AOL dot com

-----Original Message-----
From: Stewart Wechsler <ecostewart at quidnunc.net>
To: Michael Donahue <mgd at u.washington.edu>; Tweeters
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Sent: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 12:17:19 -0800
Subject: [Tweeters] Ivory-billed photos?



My question is: when is someone going to release a decent current photo of
an Ivory Billed? As time goes by with no more than that crappy fuzzy video
doubt starts to creep. If the Ivory Billeds are indeed there (and I still
lean toward believing they are) why hasn't someone posted a good photo yet?
Will that be our Christmas present?

Stewart Wechsler
West Seattle
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.5/212 - Release Date: 12/23/2005

_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
Tweeters at u.washington.edu
http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 14:40:41 -0800
From: "Ruth and/or Patrick Sullivan" <godwit at worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re Scoter Numbers
To: "Steve Ellis" <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>, "Tweeters"
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <007a01c60812$0b554910$f3eb480c at S0028818846>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello Steve ,
Few weeks back there was a program on Channel 5,that there was conducting a
study set up in a Lighthouse concerning the Herring on the West.The result
was found that many Herring was infected with a certain disease.This would
effect the whole food Chain on all the Waterfowl.We noticed already in
November and December the low numbers on Alcids..We should find out on a
release by the Fish and Wildlife in the near future.I am sorry dint give
attention the place there was setting up on this Herrings study but the
study was conducted in a light House on the coast
----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Ellis" <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Sent: Friday, December 23, 2005 9:05 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Re Scoter Numbers



>I lost the name of the person who replied about the drop in scoter numbers

> being possibly due to the change in weather. Penn Cove, our biggest draw

for

> scoters, only experiences a drop in numbers in late January into February

> when the birds go looking for herring spawn. I checked the cove almost

> weekly this fall and the birds just never appeared in large numbers.

> Hopefully they are somewhere else.

> Steve Ellis

> Coupeville, Wa

> coup.wednet.edu

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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Message: 6
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 15:01:50 -0800
From: "Kelly Cassidy" <lostriver at completebbs.com>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Microtenes?
To: "'Kathy Andrich'" <chukarbird at yahoo.com>, "'tweet'"
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <200512232301.jBNN1qIx020444 at mail-gw.fsr.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


> What is a microtene? I saw mention of this on tweeters and


Microtines are voles (genus Microtus) and similar rodents (such as
lemmings). Voles (aka "meadow mice") are usually mouse-sized. Most have
small eyes and ears. They eat mostly green vegetation. Many species have
dramatic population swings.

Voles are the bread and butter of many predators -- foxes, coyotes, many
hawks, many owls, etc. Voles tend to have short lives and lots of baby
voles (if they live long enough). "Breed fast, die young" is the vole
motto.

Dr. Kelly Cassidy
Curator, Conner Vertebrate Museum
Washington State University, Pullman, WA



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 15:34:40 -0800
From: "mike denny" <m.denny at charter.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Columbia Co. Bohemians
To: "tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, "Inland NW Birders"
<inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu>
Message-ID: <000301c60819$7286a870$0886bd44 at BLACKBIRD>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
reply-type=original

Hello All,
We just returned from a trip into Columbia Co. and discovered in the
neighborhood of 1200+ Bohemian Waxwings scattered over Dayton Washington. So
if you have never seen a Bohemian Waxwing this is the time and site to do
so.
Later Mike

********************************************************************
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
1354 S. E. Central Ave.
College Place, WA 99324
509.529.0080 (h)

IF YOU HAVEN'T BEEN BIRDING, YOU HAVEN'T LIVED!
*******************************************************************



------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 15:55:04 -0800
From: "Kevin Li" <kdli at msn.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Swarovski 80mm angled zoom scope (AT80) for sale
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY106-F16D0795759331947A2B559CF330 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

I'm posting this scope for Mark Lewis of Sea Quest Kayaking:
Swarovski 80mm angled 20-60x zoom scope for sale, about 10 years old, glass
is in excellent shape. $850.

Contact Mark at:
mark at sea-quest-kayak.com




------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 15:40:10 -0800
From: "Wayne C. Weber" <contopus at telus.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bellingham CBC results (Dec 18, 2005)
To: "TWEETERS" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <018401c6081a$37fdf540$6500a8c0 at bc.hsia.telus.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Tweeters,

Here are results from the Bellingham Christmas Bird Count--
from a message sent by Terry Wahl to the WHATCOM BIRDS
group, forwarded with permission from Terry.

I was on the count this year (for the first time in 31 years!), but
did not contribute much, other than a TURKEY VULTURE over the
Lummi Flats on Dec. 17, which could not be found on count day
(drat!)

Note the 3 SNOWY OWLS-- more than were known to be in the area
before the count. Steve Ellis, please note also the 6922 SURF SCOTERS,
plus 4800 scoter sp., most of which were probably Surfs. These could
include some of your missing birds from Penn Cove!

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus at telus.net



****************************************************************************
**

Here are results from Sunday's event. Good conditions and efforts by a
dedicated group of observers produced one of our highest species counts in
38 years. Numbers followed by 'ATH' indicate all time high counts, '>avg'
and <'avg' indicate above or below preceding 10-year averages. Note high
counts of ducks, including unidentified birds (e.g. 'duck sp.') which have
to be considered when trying to make sense of results. "Good birds"
(subjectively judged) might be Goshawk, Sora (photographed by Dick McNeely),
Black Oystercatcher, Snowy Owl, Anna's Hummingbird. And a number of
one-onlies reflect observer effort.

2005 12 18 Bellingham CBC
7 am - 5 pm. 23-37F. clear. wind NE 5-10. fw partly frozen

Brant 1660 ATH
Canada Goose 1482
Cackling Goose 20
Tundra Swan 130
Trumpeter Swan 1534 ATH
swan sp. 62
Wood Duck 41
Gadwall 67
Eurasian Wigeon 20 ATH
Am Wigeon 8344
Mallard 12586 >avg
N Shoveler 91
N Pintail 8567
Green-winged Teal 683
dabbling duck sp. 1000
Canvasback 4
Redhead 2
Ring-necked Duck 146
Greater Scaup 1217
Lesser Scaup 35
scaup sp. 86
Harlequin 18
Surf Scoter 6922 ATH
White-winged Scoter 315
Black Scoter 76
scoter sp. 4800
Long-tailed Duck 52
Bufflehead 321
Common Goldeneye 87
Barrow's Goldeneye 143
goldeneye sp. 70
Hooded Merganser 103
Common Merganser 162
Red-br. Merganser 29
Ruddy Duck 211
diving duck sp. 2002
duck sp. 14583
Red-throated Loon 17
Pacific Loon 8
Common Loon 35
loon sp. 2
Pied-b. Grebe 5
Horned Grebe 57
Red-necked Grebe 18
Western Grebe 2512
Double-cr Cormorant 845 >avg
Brandt's Cormorant 1 <avg
Pelagic Cormorant 33
cormorant sp. 34
American Bittern 1
Great Blue Heron 132 >avg
Turkey Vulture cp
Bald Eagle 130
N Harrier 53
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3
Cooper's Hawk 2
N Goshawk 1
Accipiter sp. 1
Red-tailed Hawk 147
Harlan's' Hawk 1
Rough-legged Hawk 22
Am Kestrel 6
Merlin 6
Peregrine Falcon 10 ATH
hawk sp. 1
Virginia Rail 1
Sora 1
rail sp. 1
Am Coot 435
Sandhill Crane 1
Killdeer 106
Black Oystercatcher 1
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Black Turnstone 40
Surfbird 45 ATH
Sanderling 9
Dunlin 1767
Wilson's Snipe 13
Mew Gull 449
Ring-billed Gull 71
Herring Gull 5
Thayer's Gull 27
Western Gull 2
Glaucous-wing. Gull 2015
G-wing./Western gull 47
gull sp. 1101
Common Murre 3
Pigeon Guillemot 149 ATH
Rock Pigeon 1182
Mourning Dove 76 ATH
Com. Barn Owl 7
Great Horned Owl 3
Snowy Owl 3
Barred Owl 2 ATH
Short-eared Owl 1 <avg
N. Saw-whet Owl 1
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Belted Kingfisher 17
Red-br. Sapsucker 3
Downy Woodpecker 59
Hairy Woodpecker 9
`Yellow-s' Flicker 1
`Red-s' Flicker 150
Pileated Woodpecker 5
N Shrike 4
Hutton's Vireo 2
Steller's Jay 222 ATH
crow 1756
C Raven 34
Blk-cap. Chickadee 952
Ch-back. Chickadee 171
Bushtit 496 ATH
Red-br. Nuthatch 31
Brown Creeper 27
Bewick's Wren 56
Winter Wren 115
Marsh Wren 10
Am Dipper 2
Golden-cr. Kinglet 425
Ruby-crown. Kinglet 169
kinglet sp. 10
Hermit Thrush 2
American Robin 812
Varied Thrush 183
European Starling 5134
American Pipit 39
Cedar Waxwing 48
Orange-cr. Warbler 1
Townsend's Warbler 1
Spotted Towhee 331
Am. Tree Sparrow 2
Savannah Sparrow 3
Fox Sparrow 87
Song Sparrow 492
Lincoln's Sparrow 5
White-thr. Sparrow 2
White-crown Sparrow 263
Golden-cr. Sparrow 159 >avg
`Oregon' Junco 1602
Lapland Longspur 22 >avg
Snow Bunting 9
Red-wing. Blackbird 686
W Meadowlark 28
Brewer's Blackbird 855
Brown-head. Cowbird 2
blackbird sp. 1000
Purple Finch 38
House Finch 486
finch sp. 8
Pine Siskin 11 <avg
Am Goldfinch 184
Evening Grosbeak 6
House Sparrow 1182

Total individuals 97521
Total species 134 (+2 count period)

number of observers 70 (62+8 at feeders)
miles/foot 100.75
miles/car 654.75
total party miles 755.5

hours/foot 112.5
hours/car 81.25
hours/feeder 18.25
hours/owling 10.75
total party hours 222.75



------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 16:12:26 -0800
From: "C. Anderson" <christyrae at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] FW: WDFW establishes hotline to report dead or ill
swans
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BAY105-DAV10C45CA59F724E3B9D6D63D7320 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I thought this would be of interest to the group.

_____

From: WDFW Public Affairs [mailto:do.not.reply at dfw.wa.gov]
Sent: Friday, December 23, 2005 10:38 AM
To: Christy Anderson
Subject: WDFW News Release: WDFW establishes hotline to report dead or ill
swans



WDFW NEWS RELEASE
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091
http://wdfw.wa.gov/

December 23, 2005
Contact: Jennifer Bohannon, (360) 466-4345 ext. 281

WDFW establishes hotline
to report dead or ill swans

OLYMPIA - In a continuing effort to monitor trumpeter swans that have
succumbed to lead poisoning, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
(WDFW) has established a hotline to report dead or ill swans in Whatcom,
Skagit and Snohomish counties.

The public can call (360) 466-4345, ext. 266, and leave a message with their
name and phone number, and the location and condition of the swans. The
hotline is available 24 hours a day through the end of February.

Volunteers from the Trumpeter Swan Society and the Washington Waterfowl
Association will pick up the birds. The swans die of lead poisoning after
ingesting lead shot that has been deposited in areas where the birds feed
during the winter.

Of particular importance are sick or dead swans wearing red collars,
attached to some birds to help track their movement. These swans should be
reported immediately to Martha Jordan, of the Trumpeter Swan Society, at
(206) 713-3684.

"It's best not to handle the sick or dead swans," said Jennifer Bohannon,
WDFW wildlife biologist. "Call our hotline and we will have a volunteer come
out and properly handle the bird."

Although lead shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in Washington and
British Columbia for more than a decade, it is still taking a toll on
trumpeter swans in Whatcom, Skagit and Snohomish counties, and in
southwestern British Columbia.

WDFW, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Canadian Wildlife Service, the
University of Washington, the Trumpeter Swan Society and other
non-governmental organizations are involved in a study to locate and remove
the toxic lead.


_____

This message has been sent to the WDFW All Information mailing list.
Visit the WDFW News Release Archive at: http://wdfw.wa.gov/do/newreal/
To UNSUBSCRIBE from this mailing list:
<http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.htm>
http://wdfw.wa.gov/lists/unsubscribe.htm
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Message: 11
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 16:32:54 -0800
From: Scott R a y <mryakima at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Microtenes?
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID:
<edca07900512231632r3f77f2aak4ae4a5c32f2e0209 at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Actually, I believe 'microtine' is an adjective, not a noun, as Kelly
infers.

As in, "Microtine rodents make up a high percentage of the marten's diet..."

Scott R a y

Yakima



On 12/23/05, Kelly Cassidy <lostriver at completebbs.com> wrote:

> > What is a microtene? I saw mention of this on tweeters and

>

> Microtines are voles (genus Microtus) and similar rodents (such as

> lemmings). Voles (aka "meadow mice") are usually mouse-sized. Most have

> small eyes and ears. They eat mostly green vegetation. Many species have

> dramatic population swings.

>

> Voles are the bread and butter of many predators -- foxes, coyotes, many

> hawks, many owls, etc. Voles tend to have short lives and lots of baby

> voles (if they live long enough). "Breed fast, die young" is the vole

> motto.

>

> Dr. Kelly Cassidy

> Curator, Conner Vertebrate Museum

> Washington State University, Pullman, WA

>

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>



--
Scott R a y
AFLAC Associate
Moxee, WA
509.961.2625
mryakima at gmail dot com


------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 16:44:29 -0800
From: "Mac Knight" <mac_knight at charter.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls Still Around
To: "tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <006601c60823$348f1e30$6401a8c0 at Mac>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

We were going to see the Discovery Park snowy today, but it has vanished.
Anyone know if the Stateline one is still around. I may go to Dayton on
Monday to shoot bohemian Waxwings and Stateline is not that far from Dayton.

Mac Knight
Yakiima, Wa
mac_knight at charter dot net
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Message: 13
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 16:58:41 -0800
From: "Diane Weinstein" <diane_weinstein at msn.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] FW: WDFW establishes hotline to report dead or
ill swans
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BAY108-DAV17EED674707CD32AAB79DD8D320 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Even though lead shot has been banned for waterfowl hunting in Washington
and British Columbia, is it still be used or sold?

Diane Weinstein
Issaquah WA
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Message: 14
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 17:23:01 -0800
From: Mike Patterson <celata at pacifier.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Today's owl pellet exam
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <43ACA2C0.55654855 at pacifier.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

There were 5 SNOWY OWLS at the South Jetty today. 2 were up
front and easy to see three were waaaaay back up the driftwood
valley. I collected 7 pellets today including one that appeared
to be very fresh. This last fresh pellet contained the parts of
at least 3 RED PHALAROPES.
http://home.pacifier.com/~neawanna/SNOW/20051223-2-5.JPG

Four of the pellets had parts from at least 5 BLACK RATS, based
on jaw bone counts.

The two remain pellets had bird feathers and bird bones, that
appear to be too big for phalaropes. I found legs from two gulls
(probably Mew Gulls) near popular owl loafing sites. I will be
cleaning up the feathers and bone fragments for the gull pros to
figure out. Are you up to the challenge Mary Anne?

--
Mike Patterson
Astoria, OR
celata at pacifier.com

Christmas Bird Count Calendar and FAQ for Oregon and Washington
http://home.pacifier.com/~mpatters/cbc/cbc_WAOR_reg.html


------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 17:25:27 -0800
From: "Kelly Cassidy" <lostriver at completebbs.com>
Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Microtenes?
To: "'Scott R a y'" <mryakima at gmail.com>, "'Tweeters'"
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <200512240125.jBO1PTLr056211 at mail-gw.fsr.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"


> Actually, I believe 'microtine' is an adjective, not a noun,

> as Kelly infers.

>

> As in, "Microtine rodents make up a high percentage of the

> marten's diet..."


"Microtine" is not in my Webster's Unabridged. I think it's zoology slang.
Can slang have a "correct" use? Ingles uses it both ways on page 271 of my
version (copyright 1965) of Mammals of the Pacific States.

Kelly Cassidy



------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 17:58:19 -0800
From: Hal Opperman <hal at catharus.net>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Microtenes?
To: "'Tweeters'" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BFD1EB3B.F8E6%hal at catharus.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Oxford English Dictionary has "microtine" as both noun and adjective.
Definition (n.): "A rodent of the subfamily Microtinae (family Muridae) of
rodents, which includes voles, lemmings, muskrats, and mole-voles." The
earliest use they cite is from 1895, and there are plenty of later ones.

This may be specialized technical vocabulary, Kelly, but it is not slang,
any more than "solenoid" or "metacarpal."

Hal Opperman
Medina, WA

On 12/23/05 5:25 PM, "Kelly Cassidy" <lostriver at completebbs.com> wrote:


>> Actually, I believe 'microtine' is an adjective, not a noun,

>> as Kelly infers.

>>

>> As in, "Microtine rodents make up a high percentage of the

>> marten's diet..."

>

> "Microtine" is not in my Webster's Unabridged. I think it's zoology

slang.

> Can slang have a "correct" use? Ingles uses it both ways on page 271 of

my

> version (copyright 1965) of Mammals of the Pacific States.

>

> Kelly Cassidy

>

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters





------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 19:31:33 -0800 (PST)
From: Brett Wolfe <m_lincolnii at yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls Still Around
To: Mac Knight <mac_knight at charter.net>, tweeters
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <20051224033133.19981.qmail at web34713.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Let us all hope you are a shooting photographer and not a hunter of
Bohemians.

Brett A. Wolfe
Seattle, WA
m_lincolnii at yahoo.com


Mac Knight <mac_knight at charter.net> wrote:
We were going to see the Discovery Park snowy today, but it has
vanished. Anyone know if the Stateline one is still around. I may go to
Dayton on Monday to shoot bohemian Waxwings and Stateline is not that far
from Dayton.

Mac Knight
Yakiima, Wa
mac_knight at charter dot net
_______________________________________________
Tweeters mailing list
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Message: 18
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 23:58:57 -0500
From: <mac_knight at charter.net>
Subject: Re: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls Still Around
To: Brett Wolfe <m_lincolnii at yahoo.com>, tweeters
<tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <4enjt4$1nnf4t3 at mxip20a.cluster1.charter.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

I don't think I'd be posting on tweeters if I was shooting them with
anything but a camera, would I?

I shouldn't assume, I guess, but I have posted here many times to say I had
new photos on my web site.

Mac Knight
Yakima, WA
www.pbase.com/macknight if you care to look.

mac_knight at charter.net

>

> From: Brett Wolfe <m_lincolnii at yahoo.com>

> Date: 2005/12/23 Fri PM 10:31:33 EST

> To: Mac Knight <mac_knight at charter.net>, tweeters

<tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Snowy Owls Still Around

>

> Let us all hope you are a shooting photographer and not a hunter of

Bohemians.

>

> Brett A. Wolfe

> Seattle, WA

> m_lincolnii at yahoo.com

>

>

> Mac Knight <mac_knight at charter.net> wrote:

> We were going to see the Discovery Park snowy today, but it has

vanished. Anyone know if the Stateline one is still around. I may go to
Dayton on Monday to shoot bohemian Waxwings and Stateline is not that far
from Dayton.

>

> Mac Knight

> Yakiima, Wa

> mac_knight at charter dot net

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>

>

>

>

> ---------------------------------

> Yahoo! DSL Something to write home about. Just $16.99/mo. or less

>



------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Fri, 23 Dec 2005 23:43:12 -0800 (PST)
From: "Kevin T. Moore" <onewhitecandle at yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] banded Song Sparrow in Discovery Park
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <20051224074312.6274.qmail at web32611.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Today (Friday) I saw a banded Song Sparrow in
Discovery Park, in the south parking lot, foraging
along the fence. I'm a little hard-pressed to
describe the colors, though. The right leg had a
pink-ish band (Crayola would call it peach) above
silver-metallic, and the left leg had red (well, sort
of reddish-orange) above pink (or peach).

Kevin Moore
Seattle, WA



__________________________________________
Yahoo! DSL  Something to write home about.
Just $16.99/mo. or less.
dsl.yahoo.com



------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 07:50:36 -0800
From: Steve Ellis <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re Lead Shot
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BFD2AE4C.607E%sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

The short answer is yes, lead shot is still sold in these parts
It's been banned for most hunting however it's still used in target
practice. That's okay in controlled target ranges but the users of lead
often shoot over private and public lands.
Steve Ellis
Coupeville, Wa
sellis at coup.wednet.edu



------------------------------

Message: 21
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 08:22:58 -0800
From: "Ron McCluskey" <rmcclsky at mindspring.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Microtenes?
To: "Kathy Andrich" <chukarbird at yahoo.com>, "Tweeters"
<TWEETERS at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <043901c608a6$4e527d20$f327ff04 at toshibauser>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
reply-type=original

Found this via Google on www.akzooarch.org/SAAposter2.ppt+microtene&hl=en
Microtene species are members of the rodent subfamily microtinae and include
voles, lemmings and their close relatives (Hall 1981).
Hope that helps.
Ron McCluskey,
Cheney

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kathy Andrich" <chukarbird at yahoo.com>
To: "tweet" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Sent: Friday, December 23, 2005 10:29 AM
Subject: [Tweeters] Microtenes?



>

> Hi Tweeters,

>

> What is a microtene? I saw mention of this on

> tweeters and assumed it was a vole but cannot find it

> in the Websters or googling definition of microtene.

> Is this a slang word?

>

> Kathy

> Roosting in S King County

>

>

>

>

> __________________________________________

> Yahoo! DSL - Something to write home about.

> Just $16.99/mo. or less.

> dsl.yahoo.com

>

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters




------------------------------

Message: 22
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 08:23:41 -0800
From: "Jeff Kozma" <jkozma at charter.net>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re Lead Shot
To: "Tweeters" <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <001c01c608a6$6d14a260$51d8bd42 at oemcomputer>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Yes, lead shot is still used for some types of hunting, but it is banned for
using on any type of waterfowl (in the U.S.) or anything that is hunted over
open water (sandhill cranes, rails, snipe, etc). Lead shot can still be
used to hunt upland birds such as quail, pheasant, chukar, turkey, etc.
Even though lead shot is banned for use on waterfowl, I am sure that some
hunters still use it illegally due to their belief that it is more efficient
at killing birds than steel (and in most cases, it is). Lead is heavier and
denser and thus retains its energy at a greater distance than steel.
Greater energy means greater killing efficiently. Manufacturers are making
great strides in improving non-toxic shot, such as steel. They have bumped
up the velocity on steel (Fast Steel) to improve its lethality and also have
developed such things as Heavy Shot (a mix of tungsten, nickel and iron)
that is reported to be better than lead. These new shot formulations are
more expensive than traditional steel, but they are more efficient at
bringing down large birds, like geese, resulting in less cripples than
traditional steel shot.

Jeff Kozma
Yakima




------------------------------

Message: 23
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 11:52:41 EST
From: Dougnpip at aol.com
Subject: [Tweeters] Banded Brandt's Cormorant
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <46.77908729.30ded6d9 at aol.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

While doing some North Kitsap County birding yesterday, I noticed a
banded Brandt's with white on the right leg and yellow on the left. The was
bird
behind the Hansville Store on some old dock pilings. Anyone know of someone
in the area or along the west coast who is banding this species of
cormorant?
Also, the adult Tundra Swan iis still present at the Nature
Conservancy
preserve north of Hansville.
Happy Holidays to all,
Doug Watkins
Bainbridge Is Wa


------------------------------

Message: 24
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 17:09:24 +0000
From: "Jeff Antonelis-Lapp" <jal_1 at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Enumclaw Snowy Owl
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY103-F1028E01445F857AB4695E2C6320 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

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------------------------------

Message: 25
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 09:52:31 -0800 (PST)
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker at zipcon.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Happy Holidays
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.58L0.0512240952080.20106 at zipcon.net>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

HI:
Happy Holidays and a birdy New Year!

--

Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
A.K.A.: "Birdbooker"
"Rallidae all the way!"


------------------------------

Message: 26
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 10:33:27 -0800
From: Carol Riddell <cariddell at earthlink.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] No Edmonds Snowy Owl
To: Tweeters <Tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <3FC3FACA-4E1C-404C-93CC-FE1DE6EA6449 at earthlink.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

The Snowy Owl that has been seen fairly consistently on the Edmonds
waterfront since November 23rd has not been observed for the last
several days, including this morning.

Carol Riddell
Edmonds


------------------------------

Message: 27
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 19:06:57 +0000
From: "bill shelmerdine" <georn1 at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Red Phalarope in South Sound
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Cc: slickslug at comcast.net
Message-ID: <BAY104-F312D1EE8A551FB908A8188F320 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Merry Christmas all.
This morning I had a brief encounter with a Red Phalarope on Eld Inlet, near
Cooper Point inThurston County. The bird dropped onto the water briefly
under windy (SW) conditions, then continued down the inlet. Recent storms
offshore have generated a number of reports from Oregon, including a couple
inland in the Portland area. Now appears to be a darn good time to look for
this species. Good Luck...

Bill Shelmerdine
Olympia
mailto:georn1 at hotmail.com

_________________________________________________________________
On the road to retirement? Check out MSN Life Events for advice on how to
get there! http://lifeevents.msn.com/category.aspx?cid=Retirement



------------------------------

Message: 28
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 10:48:09 -0800
From: "Wayne C. Weber" <contopus at telus.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Vancouver, BC RBA for December 23, 2005
To: "TWEETERS" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <00df01c608ba$95fc0a60$6500a8c0 at bc.hsia.telus.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

This is the Vancouver Natural History Society's Rare Bird Alert for Friday,
December 23rd, sponsored in part by Wild Birds Unlimited, with stores in
Vancouver and North Vancouver. This message was updated at 10:30 pm
on December 23rd.


Sightings for Friday, December 23rd:

At Boundary Bay in Delta, 13 SNOWY OWLS were seen from the dyke at
the foot of 72nd St. Also here was an immature GLAUCOUS GULL.

At Brunswick Point in Delta, 8 SNOWY OWLS were present.

At the Tsawwassen ferry jetty in Delta, 5 SNOW BUNTINGS and
the WILLET were seen.

On Sea Island in Richmond, 2 SNOWY OWLS were seen inside the
Vancouver Airport grounds. Nearby at Iona Island were 13 RING-NECKED
DUCKS and 2 LONG-BILLED DOWITCHERS.


No reports for Thursday, December 22nd.


No reports for Wednesday, December 21st.


No reports for Tuesday, December 20th.


Sightings for Monday, December 19th:

At Blackie Spit in Surrey, 3 MARBLED GODWITS were present.


Sightings for Sunday, December 18th:

At Boundary Bay, 6 SNOWY OWLS were seen along the foreshore,
east of the foot of 72nd Street.

In Delta, near 57B St just south of the railway tracks, 2 ROUGH-LEGGED
HAWKS were present.

In North Delta near 95th Ave and 116th St, a TOWNSEND'S WARBLER
was seen at a feeder.

At Blackie Spit in Surrey, a MARBLED GODWIT was seen. Also present
were 2 LEAST SANDPIPERS, 4 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE,
and a CACKLING GOOSE.


Sightings for Saturday, December 17th:

In Jericho Park, Vancouver, a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was seen
east of the tennis courts.

In Vancouver's Stanley Park, a HERMIT THRUSH was present near
the northeast corner of Lost Lagoon.

At Brunswick Point in Delta, 2 SNOWY OWLS were seen.


Sightings for Friday, December 16th:

In Surrey, at the mouth of the Serpentine River, the AMERICAN AVOCET
was still present. Access is from Mud Bay Park, off Colebrook Road.

At Walnut Grove Park in Langley, a WESTERN SCREECH-OWL was calling.


If you have any questions about birds or birding in the Vancouver area,
please call Wayne at (604) 597-7201, Viveka at 531-3401, or Larry at
465-1402. Thank you for calling the Vancouver Rare Bird Alert, and good
birding.

For further information about birding in the Vancouver area, log onto the
Vancouver Natural History Society's website at
www.naturalhistory.bc.ca/VNHS/ .

Message recorded and transcribed by Kevin Louth and forwarded by
Wayne Weber.


Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus at telus.net





------------------------------

Message: 29
Date: Sat, 24 Dec 2005 11:34:12 -0800 (PST)
From: Lee Cain <kisutch40 at yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Cashmere area birds
To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <20051224193412.31044.qmail at web51609.mail.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

the following data is posted at birdnotes.net

for Lee Cain

Chelan County, Washington (December 23, 2005)
Census type: Incomplete Count/Notables Counters: 1 Hours counted: 1
Percentage of sky covered by clouds: 100%
Precipitation: drizzle
Note:
birds seen in Cashmere area
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
6 Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
20 Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
1 Cooper's Hawk (Accipiter cooperii)
3 Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
1 Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) [1]
3 American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)
1 Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)
? Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)
1 Northern Shrike (Lanius excubitor) [2]
Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
Common Raven (Corvus corax)
Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
Golden-crowned Kinglet (Regulus satrapa)
Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula)
Varied Thrush (Ixoreus naevius)
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata)
Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus)
Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca)
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)
White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)
Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
Cassin's Finch (Carpodacus cassinii)
House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
American Goldfinch (Carduelis tristis)
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)
Footnotes:
[1] Nahahum Cyn
[2] juvenile

Total number of species: 27



Lee Cain
Aquatic Biology/Integrated Science
Astoria High School
http://www.astoriaschools.org/ASD/ahs/AHS%20Science/all.htm

>//////> >//////> >//////>


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