[Tweeters] Help for Pt. Pelee Birder

Cynthia Faubion cfaubion at seanet.com
Mon Jul 11 09:11:21 PDT 2005


In May, through  the "BirdingPal" network, I  met Todd Pepper from
Leamington, Ontario, who gave me a wonderful full day (free) guided birding
experience around Pt. Pelee, Ontario.  He is now coming to Seattle on July
23/24th and wants to find four target species, Black and Vaux's Swift,
Cassin's Vireo and Hermit Warbler.  He is shooting for his 700 ABA bird by
the end of the ear.  Sadly, I will be out of town that weekend and cannot
take him around.  Does anyone out there have the time to help him find these
four species?  He's a great guy and would be a super person to know if you
plan to travel to Pt. Pelee in the future.  Please email him directly at
Todd Pepper  (  tandjpepper at cogeco.ca  )

Thanks!

Cynthia Faubion
cfaubion at seanet.com.

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Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 11, Issue 10

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Today's Topics:

   1. Kent Valley - Boeing Ponds (Lynn Schulz)
   2. Fledgling Northern Mockingbirds (Bill and Nancy LaFramboise)
   3. Re House Wrens @ Misery Trailhead (Steve Ellis)
   4. Possible Booby in Bellingham Bay (Flores)
   5. Bluebird Breeding Confirmed (Steve Ellis)
   6. BOOBY sp. - Bellingham Bay - 7/9/05 (Houston Flores)
   7. Ridgefield NWR: Rails and Soras  WOW!! (bill clemons)
   8. Yes and no on BBWO (Jim McCoy)
   9. Ocean Shores shorebirding  7-9-05 (Ruth and/or Patrick Sullivan)
  10. BBWO nest abandonment (Kate K)
  11. March of the Penguins (Johnson, Mary)
  12. Northern Bobwhite @ Weir Prairie (Stefan Schlick)
  13. Re: BOOBY sp. - Bellingham Bay - 7/9/05 (Houston Flores)
  14. Re: Yes and no on BBWO (Aaron Martin)
  15. Mount Saint Helens/Plant Question (Lydia Bishop)
  16. Grant County 7/9 (Doug Schonewald)
  17. Eurasian Collared-Dove Grant County (Doug Schonewald)
  18. Nikon scope for sale (Grace & Ed Kane)
  19. Sucking sap in the city (Silverdale) (Wayne C. Weber)
  20. Kroodsma on NPR (Ian Paulsen)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 14:01:12 -0700
From: "Lynn Schulz" <linusq at worldnet.att.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kent Valley - Boeing Ponds
To: "Tweeters" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>,     "Chat Chapter"
        <rainier_chapter_chat at yahoogroups.com>
Message-ID: <09d301c584c9$6ce6b8c0$92e7480c at 5zqyd01>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
        reply-type=original

Hi Folks:
I was down at Boeing Ponds in the Kent Valley this morning, Sat, June 9.
After yesterday's 1/2 inch of rain, there was more water in the ponds than
in recent days.  Marv
Breece was there also.  He and I watched two adult Green Herons chasing each
other and perching on the snags and in trees.  Occasionally, one would fly
to the water's edge and stand still.  But mostly they were very active.
Viewing from over near the barricaded road, there were many LONG-BILLED
DOWITCHERS wading in the water.  These birds were in brick-red breeding
plumage.  I have trouble w/ the ID of dowitchers, and I carefully noted that
the Long-bills did not have any primary extension (primaries going past the
tertials)
to speak of.  That point was mentioned as a field mark for Long-billed Dows
in the west.  It was mentioned in Dennis Paulson's new book, "Shorebirds of
North America, the Photographic Guide".  The book also has many excellent
images of Long-billed vs. Short-billed Dows.  Thank you, Dennis Paulson!
The Long-b Dows occasionally called keek, keek.
A few WESTERN SANDPIPERS, and LEAST SANDPIPERS were in the water.  There
were about 6 adult GREATER YELLOWLEGS in breeding plumage.  There were a
number of SPOTTED SANDPIPERS in the area, and we saw one juv Spotty.  The
Spotties were quite vocal going yowk, yowk, yowk, and making their other
calls.
After Marv left, I remained until 11AM.  More Long-b Dows became visible and
I counted 51 at one time.  The ducks were mostly all Mallards, but just
before I left, I spotted a male PINTAIL DUCK.  The viewing is good at the
ponds with many close views possible.  Be sure to walk back past the
barricaded road to view the hidden back pond.  It gets shorebirds too.
Yours, Carol Schulz
DesMoines, WA



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 14:26:39 -0700
From: Bill and Nancy LaFramboise <wlafra at owt.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Fledgling Northern Mockingbirds
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu, inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu
Message-ID: <5.1.1.6.0.20050709142138.02f9c7b8 at mail.owt.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

The 2 Northern Mockingbirds which have been at Horn Rapids County Park
since at least May 22 have fledged 3 young.  We observed all 5 birds today.

We did not find the Eurasian Collared-Dove but did see a Gray Catbird
(locally uncommon) and a returning Warbling Vireo.  The vireo was singing.

Bill & Nancy LaFramboise
wlafra at owt.com
Richland, WA




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 14:42:55 -0700
From: Steve Ellis <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re House Wrens @ Misery Trailhead
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BEF592EF.4995%sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

We found the same birds last week and were equally shocked. We also found
them in a couple of other high spots including a pair using a nest box near
the Teal Springs Campground. I assume the box was  meant for Mt. Bluebirds
which were using the next one in line. Isn't it unusual to have House Wrens
nesting so high?
  We recorded only 1 nutcracker during our entire stay in the Blues, a bird
seen over an old burn area. Are they common in the Blues? At that site,
while trying to find woodpeckers ( only found flickers), we could hear an
old stump down in a ravine being ripped apart no doubt by a bear.
   It was our 1st trip ever to the Blues. If you haven't been you're missing
some great birding!
Steve Ellis
sellis at coup.wednet.edu


------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 17:11:18 -0700
From: "Flores" <floresnw at gte.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Possible Booby in Bellingham Bay
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, <whatcombirds at lists.wwu.edu>
Message-ID: <LHEEICOGBIEJNAELOEKDCENJCOAA.floresnw at gte.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=Windows-1252

Houston Flores just called from a whale-watching boat quite far out in
Bellingham Bay.  He asked me to post that he believes he is looking at a
sulid, probably a Brown Booby.  It has been "plunge diving" from a high
altitude, and is being mobbed by gulls.  It is at quite a distance from his
boat, but he can see that it has a dark hood and clean breast line and is
somewhat but not a lot larger than the gulls.

Houston is doing a sea-bird census from the whale watching boat, and is not
in a position to stop for better looks at the bird, but he asked me to post
this in case someone was able to go chase this.  Hope someone can find it,
I'm sure Houston will have more details to discuss later.

Thanks!
Paula Flores
Sammamish, WA
floresnw AT gte.net



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 17:27:48 -0700
From: Steve Ellis <sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Bluebird Breeding Confirmed
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <BEF5B994.499C%sellis at coup.wednet.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Whidbey Island: I went out this afternoon and found a female Western
Bluebird and 1 fledgling on the Ausable property on Smith Prairie near
Coupeville. I believe this is the 1st confirmed nesting on the island in
recent memory.
The Ausable property is a 176 acre parcel that includes forest, field, and
glacial outwash prairie remnant. I'll send directions to anyone requesting
access- birders are always welcome on the land. Ausable is an environmental
education institute.
Other Sp:
American Kestrel
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
Savannah Sparrow
Black-headed Grosbeak
American Goldfinch
White-crowned Sparrow
No. Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Pine Siskin

 There were patches of lovely Harvest Brodiaea blooming on the site- it's a
lily that blooms later in the summer than most others of it's kind.
Steve Ellis
sellis at coup.wednet.edu
Coupeville, Wa


------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 19:46:23 -0700
From: "Houston Flores" <houstonflores at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] BOOBY sp. - Bellingham Bay - 7/9/05
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu, whatcombirds at lists.wwu.edu,
        seabird at lists.wwu.edu
Message-ID: <BAY102-F238A208CB7EBFEAEE01F2DBADD0 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Hello birders,

Here are some more details on my sighting this afternoon.

At approximately 4:45 this afternoon, as the whale watching boat I was on
entered Bellingham Bay from the south, I spotted a large dark bird from a
great distance that I initially thought was a loon.  It was dark above with
a dark head, and light below and it was noticiably larger than the
surrounding terns. I then noticed that the Caspian Terns around it were
mobbing it, which I thought was puzzling, because I had never seen a loon
being mobbed before.  The bird would also bank and glide for short
distances, which I also have never seen a loon do before.

My thoughts then turned to the bird being a raptor, possibly an Osprey, but
that was quickly dispelled as I continued to watch it fly in a manner of
which was unlike a raptor, which included fanning its long tail.

After about a minute of viewing, I began to believe it was a booby, (which I
have only seen videos and pictures of), based on its size, and overall
shape.  And it was after I had begun to believe it was a booby, that it did
a spectacular plunge-dive into the water.  The dive was at a steep angle,
and much more impressive than the dives the Caspian Terns do.  It dove with
much greater velocity and with its wings tucked completely in producing a
pencil-like appearance.  This basically sinched the genus ID for me, and
then I began the struggle for field marks, as the bird remained quite a
distance from the boat.

>From what I could tell, the bird was all dark above, with a dark hood,
which
was cleanly cut off on the lower breast from the whitish underparts.  Its
flight appeared slower and less acrobatic than the surrounding terns.  The
tail-fanning was one of the most obvious field marks that I noted while
watching the bird.

It continued to be mobbed by the terns the entire time I viewed it, which
was for about 10 minutes.  Yet it continuously plunge-dove in such a
spectacular way that I am still awe-struck by it.

The best species ID I can come up with for this bird is Brown Booby, and
although I have no doubts that it was a sulid, I am definately open to
scrutinization (I did not note a pale bill, so possibly juvenile
blue-footed?).


Good Migrations,

Houston Flores
Bellingham, Wa
houstonflores AT hotmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 20:07:26 -0700 (PDT)
From: bill clemons <willclemons at yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ridgefield NWR: Rails and Soras  WOW!!
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <20050710030726.579.qmail at web30802.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Today, Carol Ledford and I birded Ridgefield NWR north
of Vancouver, WA.  While we had 50 species for the
day, without a doubt, the BEST birds of the day were
Virginia Rails and Soras, continually on display and
in the open, from 3-4:15 pm.  Total individuals seen
were 12.  SORAS: 1 adult, 3 juveniles (75% adult
size).  RAILS:  4 adults, 2 juveniles (80-90% adult
size), and 2 chicks (little black balls of fluff).
These beauties were seen at the SW side of Rest Lake
at the turnout between Rest Lake and South Big Lake.

Activities observed:

- Sometimes we saw adults and juveniles of both
species in the open simultaneously.
- Sometimes several birds were seen coming into view,
running or flying, while others were leaving.
- Baby Rail chicks doing their begging display and
being fed by parents.
- Squabbling Rails chasing Soras and each other.
- All birds running for cover during flyovers of
Eagle, Heron, Bittern, and Egret, and then returning
to the open when all clear.
- Preening, leg- and wing-stretching, wading, flying,
swimming and feeding.

bill clemons
willclemons at yahoo.com
SW of Portland in Mtn Park








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------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 04:23:22 +0000
From: "Jim McCoy" <jfmccoy at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Yes and no on BBWO
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY104-F240944517E28DC1D8A1BBBB8DD0 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

The parents have apparently abandoned the nest.  There was a doomed nestling
still inside the nest cavity, calling in vain to be fed.  After a couple of
hours of waiting, it became obvious that there was no longer any reason to
stay away from the tree, so we clambered over the rocks until we could get a
partial view in, and periodically its beak was visible as it peered out.
Ollie and Grace Oliver took the late shift, so maybe they'll have something
else to report.

On the brighter side, we saw a female American Three-toed Woodpecker working
along the road.

On the lighter side, I was watching the coverage of the Tour de France early
this morning, and Phil Liggett, the terrific commentator, spread his wings
and tried his hand at ornithology as the camera panned over a flock of white
storks.  He said "They're in migration this time of year" and "I imagine
they'll be nesting soon," and in reference to one that was perched atop a
platform, concluded with something like "he's found the place he'll stay for
the weekend."  Oh, well.  He gets credit for having the species right, and
he really is very good on the subject of cycling...




------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 22:04:41 -0700
From: "Ruth and/or Patrick Sullivan" <godwit at worldnet.att.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Ocean Shores shorebirding  7-9-05
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <00c901c5850c$e3b63c80$e1eb480c at S0028818846>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello Tweets,

Today we enjoyed a nice day at Ocean Shores with great conditions and good
numbers of shorebirds! We checked most of the main areas at Ocean Shores
during incoming tide this afternoon including Damon Point,Bill's Spit and
the outer beach areas between Driftwood Drive and Marine View Drive. We were
fortunate to run into Stefan Schlick and Michael Fleming that joined us for
the remainder of the afternoon at several locations,as we all enjoyed the
spectacle of shorebird migration. The most noteworthy observation of the day
was very large numbers of adult Western Sandpipers in various plumages with
the greatest spectacle noted during our visit to Damon Point at 3:15pm.
Large "waves" of birds were noted literally dropping down from sky,as well
as from the direction of the outer beaches and beyond and at times were very
restless and nervous. We noted 2 large separate flocks of Western Sandpipers
at the Damon Point"pond",as they attempted to roost along the drier edges
above the po!
 nd,but the birds never remained landed for more than a few seconds before
returning to the air. We estimated 10-15,000+ birds noted at Damon Point
during incoming tide with lesser numbers noted at other nearby areas. This
was definitely our grandest shorebird spectacle of the day and strong
evidence of shorebird migration! There were very small numbers of Least
Sandpipers noted within the large groups of Western Sandpipers,but for the
most part they kept to themselves in separate flocks.

Away from the large groups of Western Sandpipers we noted 15 species of
shorebirds during the entire day including returning "rockbirds" at the
Ocean Shores Jetty consisting of 3+ Surfbirds and 3 Black Turnstones. Our
visit to the Oyhut Wildlife Area produced shorebird highlights including up
to 5 Red-necked Phalaropes that were all noted together foraging in a
flooded area of Salicornia with other shorebirds nearby. On our way home we
made a stop along the Brady Loop Rd. complex after 6:30pm with a few
additional species that were added to our day list. A list of other key
highlights observed during the day included the following at selected
locations:

Red-throated Loon
4 adults at the Damon Point"pond"

Sooty Shearwater
75+ off the Ocean Shores Jetty

Brown Pelican
25 off the Ocean Shores Jetty
3 off Damon Point

Northern Shoveler
1 pair with 7 young at the Ocean Shores STP
3 females at the Hoquiam STP

Gadwall
1 female at the Hoquiam STP

Am.Wigeon
1 at the Ocean Shores STP

Greater Scaup
1 male at the Ocean Shores STP
1 pair at the Hoquiam STP

Black Scoter
1 female at the Ocean Shores Jetty

Surf Scoter
9 off the Ocean Shores Jetty
35+ at the Oyhut Wildlife Area

Turkey Vulture
1 at the Oyhut WA
1 along Hwy.12 west of Montesano
3 along the Brady Loop Rd. complex

Osprey
2 at the Ocean Shores Golf Course
1 pair at a nestsite at the Hoquiam STP
1 adult at a nestsite along Hwy.12 at Montesano

Northern Harrier
1 at Damon Point
1 at the Oyhut WA

Am.Kestrel
3 along the Brady Loop Rd. complex

Black-bellied Plover
1 at Bill's Spit

Semipalmated Plover
7 at Damon Point
10 along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Greater Yellowlegs
1 at the Ocean Shores STP
2 at the Oyhut WA
5 at Damon Point
1 at Bill's Spit

Spotted Sandpiper
1 near the Hoquiam STP

Whimbrel
55(with 10 Marbled Godwits)at Bill's Spit
22(with 1 Marbled Godwit)along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Sanderling
1 along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Western Sandpiper
145+ at the Oyhut WA
15,000+ at Damon Point
200 at Bill's Spit
125+ along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Least Sandpiper
1 at the Ocean Shores STP
15+ at the Oyhut WA
30+ at Damon Point

Short-billed Dowitcher
1 along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Long-billed Dowitcher
44 at the Oyhut WA
62 at Bill's Spit

Heermann's Gull
42+ at the Ocean Shores Jetty
15 at the Oyhut WA
20 along the outer beaches north of Driftwood Drive

Western Scrub Jay
1 along the Brady Loop Rd. complex
2 along Hwy.12 near the Satsop River bridge



Mammal highlight of the day:

1 River Otter at the Oyhut WA



Good shorebirding,

Ruth and Patrick Sullivan
Fircrest,WA
godwit at worldnet.att.net











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Message: 10
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 05:20:40 +0000
From: "Kate K" <rkohls3206 at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] BBWO nest abandonment
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY101-F97471DF318CC5BDEFF008C9DD0 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

I was saddened to read that the Tahklahk BBWOs have apparently abandoned
nest (and nestling). I would hope that this abandonment was not a result of
the many recent intrusions to "their" habitat.
Kate Kohlschmidt
Clark Coubty, Wa
Rkokls3206 at hotmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Sat, 9 Jul 2005 22:40:23 -0700
From: "Johnson, Mary" <MJohnson at becu.org>
Subject: [Tweeters] March of the Penguins
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <200507100540.j6A5eOSB019822 at b7a.becu.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

The other day someone posted here about how the "March of the Penguins"
documentary is more popular, on a per-screen basis, than the latest Tom
Cruise explosion-fest.  Today I saw it at the Egyptian Theatre on Capitol
Hill, and the line for the noon show stretched around the corner (not that
the corner was especially far away, but still . . . quite a little crowd for
a penguin flick.)  The main plot was the astonishing ordeal that Emperor
Penguins must endure to hatch and raise one chick; the penguins were
revealed as both adorably funny and gloriously beautiful, and our group of
ten, which ranged in age from 3-69, all gave it a hearty two flippers up.  A
must-see for birders!

Another link to the article that was posted here before:
http://komo4.com/stories/37817.htm

Mary Johnson
Auburn, WA
mjohnson at becu.org



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Message: 12
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:50:04 -0400
From: "Stefan Schlick" <greenfant at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Northern Bobwhite @ Weir Prairie
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY107-F8537FE4959DB49E8737F5A9DD0 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Mike Fleming and I saw a calling Northern Bobwhite at Weir Prairie at 7am
this morning. From the site described in Opperman on page 207 (Lower Weir
Prairie), go about 0.5mi north on Rainier Rd. and then turn right onto the
next prairie. Park your car after just about 0.2mi, then walk left on a
grassy road towards the trees. The bird was at the base of the first tree on
your right. Note that you will need a Ft. Lewis access permit to bird at
this site. Thanks to Jason Paulios for the tip.

Next, we drove to the Capital State Forest SW of Olympia. After gaining
significant elevation (2000ft+) on roads that start with "B-", we made two
stops along B-8500 and had (pure) Hermit Warblers on both. It seems like
that the numbering of the lines on Opperman's map has changed and the roads
that we took roughly correspond to C-4000 on page 217.

We then made our way to Ocean Shores. At the Brown Point Jetty we had 6
(fading breeding plumaged) Surfbirds just before we ran into Ruth and
Patrick Sullivan who gave us a superb tour of the local hotspots.

Stefan Schlick
Bellevue, WA




------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 23:25:54 -0700
From: "Houston Flores" <houstonflores at hotmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Re: BOOBY sp. - Bellingham Bay - 7/9/05
To: whatcombirds at lists.wwu.edu, tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <BAY102-F3624205DC6819E6258C22CBADD0 at phx.gbl>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Hey all,

I wanted to add that if anyone is going to try and see the booby in
Bellingham Bay, I think the best place to look for it from land would be
from Marine Park, in Fairhaven at the end of Harris Ave.  I kind of have the
feeling that it might not have stuck around though, considering how much it
was being mobbed.  So keep an eye out anywhere in the Sound or coast
tomorrow, who knows where it will go next.

Good Migrations,

Houston Flores
Bellingham, Wa
houstonflores AT hotmail.com




------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 01:19:20 -0700
From: Aaron Martin <aamartin at gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Yes and no on BBWO
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <a65d92cc050710011920d5e1ea at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Today Fred Parent and tried for the Black-backed Woodpecker.  We too
arived to the spot and heard constant calling from the tree.  After
waiting for about 40 minutes we saw no signs of the parents.  As we
were returning we ran into a couple of birders who I am guessing are
the Oliver's from Vancouver, WA (sorry forgot about introductions)
they said they experienced the same thing.

Sadly I believe the nestling is really doomed.  Nature can be cruel.

On the long side of Trail #134 Fred spotted a Clarks Nutcraker and
while waiting for the BBWO we could hear Barred Owls calling the
distance.  One of the highlights was the amazing views of Mt. Adams
near dusk.

Aaron Martin
Seattle, WA

On 7/9/05, Jim McCoy <jfmccoy at hotmail.com> wrote:
> The parents have apparently abandoned the nest.  There was a doomed
nestling
> still inside the nest cavity, calling in vain to be fed.  After a couple
of
> hours of waiting, it became obvious that there was no longer any reason to
> stay away from the tree, so we clambered over the rocks until we could get
a
> partial view in, and periodically its beak was visible as it peered out.
> Ollie and Grace Oliver took the late shift, so maybe they'll have
something
> else to report.
>
> On the brighter side, we saw a female American Three-toed Woodpecker
working
> along the road.
>
> On the lighter side, I was watching the coverage of the Tour de France
early
> this morning, and Phil Liggett, the terrific commentator, spread his wings
> and tried his hand at ornithology as the camera panned over a flock of
white
> storks.  He said "They're in migration this time of year" and "I imagine
> they'll be nesting soon," and in reference to one that was perched atop a
> platform, concluded with something like "he's found the place he'll stay
for
> the weekend."  Oh, well.  He gets credit for having the species right, and
> he really is very good on the subject of cycling...
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tweeters mailing list
> Tweeters at u.washington.edu
> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
>


------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 07:00:40 -0700
From: "Lydia Bishop" <gizathecat at verizon.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Mount Saint Helens/Plant Question
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <001301c58557$c4f8dd20$6501a8c0 at your70wwyrt7hs>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi Tweets,



On Thursday my husband and I hiked around the Johnston Ridge area.  The only
bird I spied was a slate colored junco at the visitor center.   I was amazed
by the wildflowers!  Even more amazing were the succulents growing along
side the trail. I read somewhere that the Mount Saint Helens area has a
unique climate and that species of plants are growing there that are not
normally found in the Washington Cascades.  Can anybody in Tweeters direct
me to articles discussing the rare and unusual plant and animal life in the
blast zone?



Oh, I got some spectacular shots of the mountain once the clouds burned off!



Thanks,

LYDIA BISHOP

Near Lake Stevens, WA



Life Is A Sit-Com On The Reality Side Of The Tube

And When It's Not A Sit-Com, It's a Soap!



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Message: 16
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:06:53 -0700
From: "Doug Schonewald" <dschone8 at donobi.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Grant County 7/9
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <LMEOKEGIHCKCABIHDIONAECJDCAA.dschone8 at donobi.net>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

Hi Tweets,

I spent the morning searching out migrating shorebirds in several areas of
Grant County. The following shorebirds were observed in several locations.
All of the birds observed were adults as should be the case this time of
year

Western Sandpiper - about 75 split evenly between Soap Lake's East Beach and
Perch Point on Potholes Reservoir
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER  - 1 at Perch Point
Lesser Yellowlegs - 1 at Soap Lake East Beach, 1 at Perch Point
Greater Yellowlegs - 2 at Perch Point
Long-billed Dowitcher - 2 at the south end of Lake Lenore
Killdeer - everywhere and a noisy nuisance spooking shorebirds everywhere
with alarm calls
American Avocet - 28 scattered everywhere, with the most (17) located at
several locations on Soap Lake.
Black-necked Stilt - several pair on Lake Lenore and another pair with young
on Moore Road (Blue Lake) that offered excellent views and photo
opportunities
Spotted Sandpipers - 6 in several locations, most at Perch Point

Other birds of note during the trip included:

Lark Sparrow - many in several locations with about a dozen near Dry Falls
Lake at Sun Lakes State Park and another dozen or so along Road 'C' NE
behind the Rocky Ford WA.
Grasshopper Sparrow - several along Road 'C' NE
Loggerhead Shrike - a good year for these. At least seven seen along SR-17
and Road 'C' NE
Red-necked Grebe - a pair nesting at Alkali Lake and a single male at Banks
Lake.

Cheers

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA
dschone8 at donobi.net
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.11/45 - Release Date: 7/9/2005




------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:10:14 -0700
From: "Doug Schonewald" <dschone8 at donobi.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Eurasian Collared-Dove Grant County
To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <LMEOKEGIHCKCABIHDIONIECJDCAA.dschone8 at donobi.net>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

Tweets,

Randy Hill, AKA Mr. Collared-Dove, just called to leave directions to
another Grant Count Collared-Dove. The dove is located near the Warden High
School along or near Road 'U' NE. It is in a back yard calling loudly and
regularly.

Cheers

Doug Schonewald
Moses Lake, WA
dschone8 at donobi.net
--
No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.323 / Virus Database: 267.8.11/45 - Release Date: 7/9/2005




------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:14:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: Grace & Ed Kane <kane3d2001 at yahoo.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] Nikon scope for sale
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <20050710171400.71446.qmail at web30212.mail.mud.yahoo.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

40mm, 15x-45x zoom eyepiece.

Email offline or call.

Ed Kane
kane3d2001 at yahoo.com
425-277-9784

Renton, Wa

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:13:53 -0700
From: "Wayne C. Weber" <contopus at telus.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Sucking sap in the city (Silverdale)
To: "TWEETERS" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID: <005801c58572$bff07520$6500a8c0 at bc.hsia.telus.net>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

Tweeters,

Sometimes, you find a bird in a place where you least expect to see it.
Red-breasted Sapsuckers are not a species that one usually thinks of
as an urban bird, although they will occasionally invade urban areas in
winter cold spells. In fact, they are probably commonest as breeding
birds at higher altitudes in the Cascades and Olympics.

I spent most of yesterday birding in Kitsap County, trying to familiarize
myself with an area that I rarely bird (and of course, trying to add a few
species to my county list). One of the birds that had eluded me so far
was the Red-breasted Sapsucker. A couple of weeks ago, I was driving
through Port Gamble and heard woodpecker nestlings calling from a
wooded area. Suspecting a sapsucker nest, I parked the car, found the
nest, and waited for the adults to come. However, nobody showed up
after 20 minutes (as the nestlings continued to call), and I gave up.

Yesterday, as I emerged from dinner in the early evening at Skipper's
in Silverdale, I heard a sapsucker-type call, and saw a sapsucker-sized
bird flying south over a row of maple trees along Silverdale Way,
the main drag of Silverdale. Those of you who know this area will know
that most of it is covered with buildings and asphalt, with only scattered
trees--  not what you'd think of as prime sapsucker habitat.

I didn't see where the bird landed, but it looked like it wasn't going far.
You're not eluding me again, I thought, as I grabbed my binos and jaywalked
across the busy traffic on Silverdale Way. As I got to the south end of the
row of maples, I thought I could hear the bird still calling, above the
noise of the traffic, from a few trees on the far side of Myrhe Road, a
crossroad. I jaywalked again, determined to find the bird. By the time
I crossed Myrhe, the bird had stopped calling. However, among the
few trees was a white birch. Knowing that sapsuckers are particularly
fond of birches, I approached the birch tree, and sure enough, there
were sapsucker holes in the bark. A short search revealed the bird--
an adult--  on the trunk about 20 feet up in the tree, where it stayed for
several minutes.

I found myself next to the local Bank of America, peering up through my
binoculars to try to get a good view of the sapsucker. An ATM customer gave
me a funny look as he walked from and to his car.  It's a good thing the
local police didn't come by, I thought, or they would have grilled me for
sure. (Silverdale probably has anti-jaywalking laws, too.)

So birders, always be alert to the possibility of an unusual or interesting
bird, even in the middle of beautiful downtown Silverdale.

One final thought--  does the habitat make this bird a city 'sucker, as
opposed to a city slicker?  (Sorry, couldn't resist.)


Good luck and good birding,

Wayne C. Weber
Delta, BC
contopus at telus.net





------------------------------

Message: 20
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:54:32 -0700 (PDT)
From: Ian Paulsen <birdbooker at zipcon.net>
Subject: [Tweeters] Kroodsma on NPR
To: tweeters at u.washington.edu
Message-ID: <Pine.LNX.4.58L0.0507101053320.14888 at zipcon.net>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

HI:
 Donald Kroodsma on NPR at:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4699207#email

--
Ian Paulsen
Bainbridge Island, WA, USA
A.K.A.: "Birdbooker"
"Rallidae all the way!"


------------------------------

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