[Tweeters] UV vision in Aves

Eric Kowalczyk aceros at mindspring.com
Mon Mar 12 07:41:40 PDT 2007


I do not know about seabirds, but I remember reading in the early 80's an
article in some obscure Australian journal that monomorphic Psittacines
were visually different when viewed under UV light. I also recall reading
something about starlings and UV. I would not be surprised to find that
this phenomena is  more widespread amongst vertebrates. Might be a good
topic for an aspiring graduate student!

Eric Kowalczyk
Seattle


> [Original Message]
> From: monte merrick <montemerrick at speakeasy.net>
> To: Rachel <RachelWL at msn.com>
> Cc: <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
> Date: 3/11/2007 11:55:35 PM
> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Male/female colors
>
> do you have more info about that?
> i'd be really interested to see how it  applies to seabirds and the like
> thanks
>
> monte merrick
> wildlife rehabilitator/oiled bird care specialist
> lummi island washington
> montemerrick at speakeasy.net
>
> On Mar 11, 2007, at 11:23 PM, Rachel wrote:
>
> > A study came out a number of years ago that showed that the Blue Tit, 
> > a European species always thought to be sexually monomorphic, 
> > shows obvious sexual dimorphism in the ultra-violet range.  The birds 
> > presumably can see the difference, but our human eyes can't.  It would 
> > be interesting to know how common this is in birds.
> >  
> > Rachel Lawson
> > Seattle
> > RachelWL at msn.com
> >  _______________________________________________
> > Tweeters mailing list
> > Tweeters at u.washington.edu
> > http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
> >
>

-------------- next part --------------
do you have more info about that?

i'd be really interested to see how it  applies to seabirds and the
like

thanks


<fontfamily><param>Courier</param><x-tad-smaller>monte merrick

wildlife rehabilitator/oiled bird care specialist

lummi island washington

montemerrick at speakeasy.net</x-tad-smaller></fontfamily>


On Mar 11, 2007, at 11:23 PM, Rachel wrote:


<excerpt><fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>A study came out a
number of years ago that showed that the Blue Tit, a European
species always thought to be sexually monomorphic, shows obvious
sexual dimorphism in the ultra-violet range.  The birds presumably can
see the difference, but our human eyes can't.  It would be interesting
to know how common this is in birds.</smaller></fontfamily>

 

<fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>Rachel Lawson</smaller></fontfamily>

<fontfamily><param>Arial</param><smaller>Seattle</smaller></fontfamily>

<fontfamily><param>Arial</param><color><param>0000,0000,EEEE</param><smaller>RachelWL at msn.com</smaller></color></fontfamily>

 _______________________________________________

Tweeters mailing list

Tweeters at u.washington.edu

http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters


</excerpt>



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