[Tweeters] Re: What did the birds do in cold weather before any paved roads

Scott R a y mryakima at gmail.com
Wed Dec 15 00:48:55 PST 2010



> 2. What did the birds do in cold weather before any paved roads were

> contracted?


Before there were roads in Washington (and most other states) there
were no Ring-necked Pheasants nor Gray Partridges. Both species were
introduced well after roads had been built.


Scott R
Yakima, WA
mryakima at gmail dot com







On Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 12:27 AM, <notcalm at comcast.net> wrote:

> Hello group,

> Questions:

> 1. How many birds do you all estimate we lose each Winter to this type of

> bird death?

> 2. What did the birds do in cold weather before any paved roads were

> contracted?

> 3. Is there something we can do to provide the birds with safe areas to

> congregate during long spells of cold weather and snow, given that we have

> provided an attractive nuisance? (Hey, believe me, I am glad we made the

> roads so that I can travel to see the birds, but maybe there is something we

> can do to prevent this unintended consequence of our human actvities.)

> 4. Has anyone found anything that works?

> Thanks,

> Dan Reiff

>

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: vogelfreund at comcast.net

> To: "Bill Anderson" <billandersonbic at yahoo.com>

> Cc: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 11:28:05 PM

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Re: Birds sitting on the road in rural

> Eastern        Washington

>

> Hi,

>

> Black-top asphalt roads retain warmth. In other states, rattlesnakes and

> cattle (Mexico), for example, like to lie on the roads, causing accidents.

> When I was in Korea in the early 1960's, I almost ran over several humans

> (farmers or etc.) who were lying on the warm road late at night out in the

> country.

>

> Phil Hotlen

> Bellingham, WA

> ----------------------------------------

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Bill Anderson" <billandersonbic at yahoo.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Sent: Tuesday, December 14, 2010 9:45:07 PM

> Subject: [Tweeters] Re: Birds sitting on the road in rural Eastern

> Washington

>

> Were the surrounding fields snow covered?   If so, the birds may have been

> attracted to the road because it was bare.  Perhaps the birds were attracted

> to the road for warmth, as pavement retains heat better than soil.

> Bill Anderson; Edmonds, WA.

>

> ________________________________

> From: ECollins <circle2square at yahoo.com>

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Sent: Tue, December 14, 2010 5:28:45 PM

> Subject: [Tweeters] Birds sitting on the road in rural Eastern Washington

>

> While visiting a friend in Reardan, WA, west of Spokane she mentioned that

> last Wednesday there were Ring-necked Pheasants sitting on her rural road

> (during the day) and she was unable to stop before hitting the male. Then

> later the same night on the same road she hit a flock of Gray Partridges

> which were flushed from the other lane into hers by oncoming traffic and,

> unable to stop or swerve, she killed several of them. It was horrible for

> her and we would very much like to know why she's never seen these birds

> sitting on her road in the six years she has lived there. They feel

> confident no one released game birds, the weather wasn't particularly bad

> for that area, and the birds were not near clusters of trees and wet areas.

> They drive the road nearly every day so it was really unusual behavior.

>

> Elizabeth Collins

> NE Portland

>

>

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