[Tweeters] The Messenger

Christine Southwick clsouth at u.washington.edu
Mon Jul 11 08:00:21 PDT 2016


Two of the causes for dwindling Olive-sided Flycatchers (OSFL) in my area of Shoreline:

Neighbors cut down a tree with a bald top (ugly from their point of view)--from which an OSFL called and sallied-forth from for at least five years. I was saddened by that.

Then, and this is a problem in most of our parks and some yards,
our forests are not able to regenerate (renew) mostly because of the IVY preventing young trees from growing and reaching maturity.

I had for a several more years OSFLs calling from a few of the older tall trees in the park behind my house. When recent wind storms caused these wildlife trees to fall, there were no more "good" flycatching trees from which to fly out and catch bugs. I also haven't heard this year the migrating Pacific-slope that I often hear (but the early heat may have changed when they migrated).

So, if you have what you think is an ugly tree--consider leaving it standing for the birds and wildlife. If you think it isn't safe, have it made into a SNAG---limbs mostly removed, top cut--that trunk will stand for years without falling, and will bring in woodpeckers, and then other smaller cavity nesters will use them too.

And make WAR ON IVY!!! Ivy is only good for rats and spiders, and kills trees and seedlings, both by weight and by crowding out the sun on roots and smothering new tree seedlings.

Christine Southwick
N Seattle/ Shoreline
clsouthwick at q.com


On Sun, 10 Jul 2016, Teresa Michelsen wrote:


> Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2016 12:44:29 -0700

> From: Teresa Michelsen <teresa at avocetconsulting.com>

> To: 'Jeff Gibson' <gibsondesign at msn.com>,

> 'tweeters' <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: RE: [Tweeters] The Messenger

>

>

> I used to hear them all the time in my (2-acre with a ravine) yard in Kenmore – early 2000s. Then I noticed they were dwindling. Later I never had them, and noticed a number of other of the birds I

> had in the early years were gone too. The next time I heard/saw one was in Panama. Having just moved to Snoqualmie, I have heard one this year so far. Just one…

>

>  

>

> From: tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Jeff Gibson

> Sent: Sunday, July 10, 2016 10:25 AM

> To: tweeters

> Subject: [Tweeters] The Messenger

>

>  

>

> Here in my neck of Port Townsend, I'm still getting a good message from a neighborhood  Olive-sided Flycatcher in the morning, with it's loud "quick - three- beers " call. The not so great message

> is when you don't hear anything, as Tweeters have recently pointed out.

>

>  

>

> Maybe some of your neighborhood Olive-sided's have moved on to daily six-packs of beers, being depressed (and desperate) about lack of winter habitat and/or the poisoning of their insect food

> supplies. When the fat flycatcher stops singing, I guess that opera is over. But not quite yet.

>

>  

>

>  It's sad, and increasingly obvious to long time nature observers to witness the loss of natural diversity. When the birds stop singing, you could be next.  It's a dichotomous world  we are now

> living in - more information about nature and more ignorance at the same time.

>

>  

>

> I have a subscription to Netflix online, and just recently noted that they are streaming "The Messenger", the excellent documentary about the plights of migratory songbirds around the world that

> came out this spring. The "messenger" being the "canary in the coal mine" -  the message being singing or silence. The movie is saved from being totally depressing by the many stories from people

> (scientists and others) who are actually bringing some light to the situation, and doing something about it, as they can.

>

>  

>

> While the message is somewhat a downer sometimes ,yet our world is still incredibly rich with life, which I continue to enjoy and share, and help as I can, before i do the last croak myself.

>

>  

>

> Jeff Gibson

>

> still croaking in 

>

> Port Townsend Wa

>

>

>


Christine Southwick
Pharmacy Administration
University of Washington Medical Center
Box 356015
1959 NE Pacific Street
Seattle, WA 98195-6015
phone: 206-598-7398; fax 206-598-6075



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