[Tweeters] Re: Hummers

Elizabeth Moncrief l.moncrief at me.com
Fri Jul 15 12:19:30 PDT 2016


I am able to report that our Anna's stay year round and the Rufous come around the end of April - September-ish. They fuss with each other constantly between 4 feeders but now are feeding equally on the hanging flower baskets. They're very cooperative around 6-7 p.m. and every body gets a seat at a feeder. We're guessing that they want to fuel up for the night so are a little more forgiving of each other. We do have one smaller feeder patrolled by a very rough looking male Anna's. I'm sure that he has mange or terrible fleas (if that is possible). All of his time is spent on his trapeze next to the feeder, scratching and fussing, or keeping all others away from 'his' feeder. He's in terrible shape so we just let him have his way.
We love having the Anna's year round and in the winter months we bring the feeders in at 10 pm and out again at 5ish so that they don't freeze. We're located a couple of miles west of Burlington, WA. Liz




> On Jul 15, 2016, at 12:00 PM, tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

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> Today's Topics:

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> 1. More on Hummers (jacknolan62 at comcast.net)

> 2. Reported Sprague Pipits at Baird Springs Road north of Quincy

> (B B)

> 3. follow-up on possible Sprague's Pipit - false alarm (Matt Bartels)

> 4. Scrub Jays (Philip Dickinson)

> 5. Re: Question about hummers (Philip Dickinson)

> 6. Re: Question about hummers (Kristin)

> 7. Acorn Woodpecker (Roger Moyer)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 20:07:32 +0000 (UTC)

> From: jacknolan62 at comcast.net

> Subject: [Tweeters] More on Hummers

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID:

> <628753011.39827629.1468526852763.JavaMail.zimbra at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Something I've noticed this year is that I have a Female Anna's being very territorial. I know males normally exhibit this behavior, but this is the first time I've seen a female do it. I also had a female Rufous the other day.

>

> I put out 3 feeders to combat the territorial nature, but I guess she's pretty adamant.

>

> Jack Nolan

> Shoreline, WA.

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> Message: 2

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 21:53:34 +0000 (UTC)

> From: B B <birder4184 at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Reported Sprague Pipits at Baird Springs Road

> north of Quincy

> To: Tweeters Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Cc: Jon Houghton <jon.houghton at hartcrowser.com>

> Message-ID:

> <1678311850.3427441.1468533214325.JavaMail.yahoo at mail.yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Apologies for any typos but my computer is down with virus so phone only.

> Yesterday an Ebird report included a Sprague's Pipit on Baird's Springs Road in the Beezely Hills north of Quincy in Grant County.

> Jon Houghton and I were returning from a fun 2 day trip to Eastern WA and when we hit the I-90 and I-82intersection, since it would be a life bird for each of us, we decided to give it a try despite not knowing the observers and the report not including photos that were said to be added later. We did NOT find the bird but provide this info for anyone who might be inclined to look.

> The Ebird report says the bird was gound between Monument Road and J Road on Baird Springs. However the map point included in Ebird is about 2 miles further East. We covered the entire area. The road is partially paved and partially gravel...both good and not busy. There is some wonderful sage and some grassland/wheatfields partially cultivated.

> The Pipit was reported associating with a small group of Horned Larks. We found a few individual Horned Larks. The report covered 6 kilometers over 1+ hours. We spent 90+ minutes covering maybe 5 miles. It is a BIG area and a Pipit could easily be there and not seen.

> A bummer to not find the possible Pipit but it was an interesting and worthwhile visit. We had 25+ Lark Sparrows, 4 or 5 Loggerhead Shrikes, a Sage Thrasher and a couple Vesper Sparrows. No Partridges (as reported) but definitely good habitat. The sage was really healthy and would be worth a visit in the Spring.

> Hope the bird is really there and is foun again. Good luck and hope this helps.

>

>

> Blair Bernson

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 20:57:07 -0700

> From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] follow-up on possible Sprague's Pipit - false

> alarm

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <ACF74C17-1FB6-4A68-9798-FCC09EAFD27A at earthlink.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Hi all -

> I just got a look at a photo of the bird reported as a possible Sprague’s Pipit on eBird recently, that Blair mentioned.

>

> It looks definitive for a juvie Horned Lark - if you’ve run across young Horned Larks in the field, you know how completely unlike adults they can look, and can understand how Sprague’s Pipit might come to mind.

>

> Not to say we shouldn’t have our eyes open for Sprague’s Pipit in the state - both Oregon & British Columbia have records of that species, so it certainly one we might find before long. Oregon’s two records come from October & January, but BC records [maybe a half dozen] seem to be from June-Sep, so more like the current season.

>

> Want more speculation on possible new state birds? [here comes the plug] - The latest issue of WOS News includes an article I put together with discussion of the topic, including predictions from 17 state birders guessing what the next birds for the state will be - fortunately, no one took the technically correct but not as exciting route of predicting Woodhouse’s Scrub-Jay - a new species for the state list by virtue of the recent Western Scrub-Jay split [we’ve got one record in the state for Woodhouse’s , the rest of our Scrub-Jays are now California Scrub-Jay].

>

> Take a look at the article, linked below, if interested in speculation and guesswork!

> http://wos.org/newsletters/current/predicting-the-new-wa-state-birds/ <http://wos.org/newsletters/current/predicting-the-new-wa-state-birds/>

>

> Matt Bartels

> Seattle, WA

>

>> On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:53 PM, B B <birder4184 at yahoo.com> wrote:

>>

>> Apologies for any typos but my computer is down with virus so phone only.

>>

>> Yesterday an Ebird report included a Sprague's Pipit on Baird's Springs Road in the Beezely Hills north of Quincy in Grant County.

>>

>> Jon Houghton and I were returning from a fun 2 day trip to Eastern WA and when we hit the I-90 and I-82intersection, since it would be a life bird for each of us, we decided to give it a try despite not knowing the observers and the report not including photos that were said to be added later. We did NOT find the bird but provide this info for anyone who might be inclined to look.

>>

>> The Ebird report says the bird was gound between Monument Road and J Road on Baird Springs. However the map point included in Ebird is about 2 miles further East. We covered the entire area. The road is partially paved and partially gravel...both good and not busy. There is some wonderful sage and some grassland/wheatfields partially cultivated.

>>

>> The Pipit was reported associating with a small group of Horned Larks. We found a few individual Horned Larks. The report covered 6 kilometers over 1+ hours. We spent 90+ minutes covering maybe 5 miles. It is a BIG area and a Pipit could easily be there and not seen.

>>

>> A bummer to not find the possible Pipit but it was an interesting and worthwhile visit. We had 25+ Lark Sparrows, 4 or 5 Loggerhead Shrikes, a Sage Thrasher and a couple Vesper Sparrows. No Partridges (as reported) but definitely good habitat. The sage was really healthy and would be worth a visit in the Spring.

>>

>> Hope the bird is really there and is foun again. Good luck and hope this helps.

>>

>> Blair Bernson

>>

>> _______________________________________________

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>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 22:06:27 -0700

> From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jays

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <CAF7jaVeLbvo2kye4mVGmWsHg5t_Zn+8A_sev+-oGrzsidXRdMw at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Following up on Matt Bartel's comments about scrub jays, the AOU

> description says that California Scrub Jays are overall darker in color

> than Woodhouse's. Earlier this year, I photographed one of the Everett

> jays. I don't have much experience with this species, since I only recently

> moved here from the East Coast, but I would say that the bird meets the

> "darker" standard. The AOU commentary also says that California has been

> seen in eastern Washington. I think we can safely say western Washington,

> too.

>

> https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/cHKirOPBsSeXYx0Qj-Yy-tMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

>

> Phil Dickinson

> Lake Stevens

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 5

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 22:54:02 -0700

> From: Philip Dickinson <pdickins at gmail.com>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Question about hummers

> To: Steve Loitz <steveloitz at gmail.com>

> Cc: TWEETERS <tweeters at u.washington.edu>, "BAXTER, LARRY"

> <natural.world.explorer at gmail.com>

> Message-ID:

> <CAF7jaVca-n0rWZ7XgrMELWTMd=p1W-x5jdXxqaEjYjbpWVRH2A at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> During breeding season, hummers gather protein (insects) for their chicks

> and for themselves. They fatten up on sugar water when they arrive after a

> long migration flight, to prepare themselves for fall migration, or, in the

> case of year-round Anna's, to increase protection against our winter

> weather. After seeing very little activity during May and June, I am

> seeing feeder activity pick up in recent days especially by females and

> juveniles.

>

> Phil Dickinson

> Lake Stevens

>

>> On Thu, Jul 14, 2016 at 11:22 AM, Steve Loitz <steveloitz at gmail.com> wrote:

>>

>> I concur with Hal. For years of mountain travel in the Cascades we've seen

>> RUHUs work up from the lowlands into montane, then subalpine, then alpine

>> zones as spring turns into summer, leaving only ANHUs in the westside

>> lowlands.

>>

>> Steve Loitz

>> Seattle

>>

>>> On Thu, Jul 14, 2016 at 11:07 AM, Hal Michael <ucd880 at comcast.net> wrote:

>>>

>>> One thing that hummers, at least here (Rufous??) do is migrate upslope

>>> into the mountains chasing bugs and wildflowers. Looking for a dense food

>>> supply prior to migration. What's left may be the now-esident Anna's.

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>> Hal Michael

>>> Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation

>>> Olympia WA

>>> 360-459-4005

>>> 360-791-7702 (C)

>>> ucd880 at comcast.net

>>>

>>> ------------------------------

>>> I live on 5 acers completely surrounded by over 50 acres of forest.

>>>

>>> I have the same event happen every year with the hummingbirds that come

>>> to my feeders.

>>>

>>> In the early spring, I have many hummingbirds swarming the feeders. I

>>> have 5 feeders out, each with 6 holes. There are so many humming birds

>>> that they are swarming around tthe feeders like bees coming into a hive.

>>>

>>> In the early part of July everything changes. Nearly all the hummers

>>> dissappear. For the rest of the summer there are only 2 or 3 that come in

>>> and out on an occasional basis.

>>>

>>> I've lived in this house for about 19 years now and the same event has

>>> happened every single year.

>>>

>>> Can anybody help shed light on what's going on?

>>>

>>> Larry Baxter

>>> Camano Island

>>>

>>> _______________________________________________

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>>>

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>>

>>

>> --

>> Steve Loitz

>> Seattle, WA

>> steveloitz at gmail.com

>>

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>

> Message: 6

> Date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 23:25:25 -0700

> From: Kristin <KristinStewart01 at comcast.net>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Question about hummers

> To: Hal Michael <ucd880 at comcast.net>

> Cc: tweeters at u.washington.edu, "BAXTER, LARRY"

> <natural.world.explorer at gmail.com>

> Message-ID: <3121FD37-6B87-416C-9C0D-ED5E8D1A01D5 at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> The several male Rufous (probably at least 4) left our place about 2 weeks ago, but I still have females and youngsters, as well as resident Anna's of all ages. I was going thru 4 (glass, in an effort to avoid plastic)

> feeders which hold about a cup each every day and a half. Now every 2-3 1/2 days, but I also have tons of hummer flowers now blooming in the yard. We have 5 acres, mostly native, not all planted in flowers, but lots of bee and hummer plants now blooming profusely in extensive beds near the house. It seemed to me the male rufous stayed around way longer than usual this year.

>

> FYI: it has just started to bloom as an overwintering sort of tender perennial but Salvia "amistad" is a tall glorious purple salvia that hummers adore, and bees like. It has been available from Fred Meyer in mid to late June and among other attributes is beautiful! Salvias and penstemon are hummer favourites, and much to my surprise, so are red dahlias but I think they may be search of insects ?

>

> Also most salvias and penstemons are really bee magnets: native bees, bumblebees, and honey bees! Plant them!

>

> Kristin Stewart

> Olympia

>

>

> Sent from my iPhone

>

>> On Jul 14, 2016, at 11:07 AM, Hal Michael <ucd880 at comcast.net> wrote:

>>

>> One thing that hummers, at least here (Rufous??) do is migrate upslope into the mountains chasing bugs and wildflowers. Looking for a dense food supply prior to migration. What's left may be the now-esident Anna's.

>>

>>

>>

>> Hal Michael

>> Science Outreach Director, Sustainable Fisheries Foundation

>> Olympia WA

>> 360-459-4005

>> 360-791-7702 (C)

>> ucd880 at comcast.net

>>

>> I live on 5 acers completely surrounded by over 50 acres of forest.

>>

>> I have the same event happen every year with the hummingbirds that come to my feeders.

>>

>> In the early spring, I have many hummingbirds swarming the feeders. I have 5 feeders out, each with 6 holes. There are so many humming birds that they are swarming around tthe feeders like bees coming into a hive.

>>

>> In the early part of July everything changes. Nearly all the hummers dissappear. For the rest of the summer there are only 2 or 3 that come in and out on an occasional basis.

>>

>> I've lived in this house for about 19 years now and the same event has happened every single year.

>>

>> Can anybody help shed light on what's going on?

>>

>> Larry Baxter

>> Camano Island

>>

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

>>

>> _______________________________________________

>> Tweeters mailing list

>> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

>> http://mailman1.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters

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>

> Message: 7

> Date: Fri, 15 Jul 2016 08:29:54 +0000

> From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1 at hotmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Acorn Woodpecker

> To: "Tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <DM3PR13MB057194B3743CD6C38F789392FF330 at DM3PR13MB0571.namprd13.prod.outlook.com>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

>

>

> Are there still some Acorn Woodpeckers in Kilikitat County. If so can someone contact me off list as to their current location.

>

> Roger Moyer

> Concord, NC

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