[Tweeters] Slightly off topic re Rubber Boa Snake (Randy)

randy collins rancol23 at yahoo.com
Wed Jun 1 13:04:20 PDT 2016


Mary,
I shuddered when I read the first sentence of your post  ( "While replacing a window constantly hit by birds on the south side of my house..." )
I hope that you applied some stickers to your window or took similar deterrent measures to protect the birds. You can buy them online or I believe at the Audubon Nature Store.
Some ideas: 15 products that prevent window strikes - BirdWatching


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15 products that prevent window strikes - BirdWatching
Screens, films, decals, and other easy-to-use products that will prevent birds from hitting the windows of your ... | |

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Regards, Randy

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Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 142, Issue 1

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Today's Topics:

  1. RE: Slightly off topic re Rubber Boa Snake (Scott R a y)
  2. Memorial Day weekend birding and a heads up about dogs (Izzy Wong)
  3. House Wren & Whimbrels Continue @ Discovery Park (Michael Fleming)
  4. RFI: Birding sites in Nevada,    Arizona and Parts of California
      (LARRY BAXTER)
  5. Re: RFI: Birding sites in Nevada,    Arizona and Parts of
      California (ck park)
  6. Washtucna report (Randy Hill)
  7. Female Yellow-headed Blackbird Point No Point (Richard Wright)
  8. stupid junko (Dennis Moore)
  9. more pelicans over Edmonds (Brien Meilleur)
  10. Jetty Island, Memorial Day (Dennis Moore)
  11. RE: Washtucna report (Randy Hill)
  12. Test (Joel Haas)
  13. summer bird camp for youngsters (Twink Coffman)
  14. Re: summer bird camp for youngsters (Charis Snyder Gilbert)
  15. second test, error problem, sorry (Joel Haas)
  16. Stanwood Water Treatment Plant Black Phoebe (Josh Adams)


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Message: 1
Date: Tue, 31 May 2016 15:54:38 -0500
From: Scott R a y <mryakima at gmail.com>
Subject: [Tweeters] RE: Slightly off topic re Rubber Boa Snake
To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Message-ID:
    <CAKY50yqRgw0egnZC+uXMREkRGAzd2=qY8hoPhCrjnQ97onFFuA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8

Mary,

Fun find.  Rubber Boas are more common in western WA than most people
think, and can be easily found if a few hours of searching is done.

The primary prey items for this species are "pinky" mice and voles.
They invade the nest of mice to find the baby rodents, and fend off
the defending mother with their blunt tail which the mother attacks as
if it were the snake's head. Rubber Boas are not fast enough to catch
adult birds, but might take nestlings from a nest on the ground.

Cheers,

Scott Ray


From: tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu
[mailto:tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of mary
hrudkaj
Sent: Sunday, May 29, 2016 10:04 AM
To: Tweeters Tweeters Bird Chat <tweeters at u.washington.edu>
Subject: [Tweeters] Slightly off topic re Rubber Boa Snake



While replacing a window constantly hit by birds on the south side of
my house (the place from which to watch mountain quail) we found a
tiny tan rubber boa snake Saturday afternoon.  It was about 8-9 inches
long so probably one of last year's kids.  It was in a flower bed just
under the window.  Why birds foraging there haven't eaten it and why
it was there in the first place are unknown.



My question is, how common are rubber boas in western WA and how
common is it to see one?  My reptile book said it is pretty uncommon
to find them as they usually hang out under rotting logs or are
alongside streams or lakes.  Nearest body of water here is about 700
feet west downslope at the Tahuya River.  Being chilly the little
guy/gal allowed me to hold and measure it and get a couple photos of
it in my gloved hand.  It was the tan (earthworm color almost) version
of the rubber boa.



Made my day getting a new reptile species for the yard.



Mary Hrudkaj

Belfair/Tahuya



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