[Tweeters] Shoreline Snow Bunting

Claudia Turner cjmackturner1 at gmail.com
Sun Oct 23 06:42:42 PDT 2016


Yes, we saw the Snow Bunting on 10/15 at Sky Nursery, ground feeding in the tree department. It was an amazingly tame bird. I just posted this on eBird.

Claudia Turner
Shoreline



> On Oct 22, 2016, at 12:00 PM, tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

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> Today's Topics:

>

> 1. Union Bay Watch } A Little Brown Bird (Hubbell)

> 2. Asotin county Lesser Black-backed Gull (Keith Carlson)

> 3. Fwd: "Grizzly Morgan" - N. Cascades ecosystem (Barbara Deihl)

> 4. western meadowlark in Seward Park (Tim Billo)

> 5. Shoreline Snow Bunting? (Joshua Glant)

> 6. Snoqualmie Valley Great Egret (hank.heiberg)

> 7. Pend Orville Co scoters & Long-tailed Duck, Spokane Co.

> Scoter, Swamp Sparrow & Am. Tree Sparrow (Matt Bartels)

> 8. Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf Course

> monthly bird walk - 10-20-2016 (Denis DeSilvis)

> 9. ravens (dlmoor2 at coastaccess.com)

> 10. Green heron lewis co. (Jerry Swena)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 12:57:47 -0700

> From: Hubbell <ldhubbell at comcast.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Union Bay Watch } A Little Brown Bird

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID: <CF1D3849-06E3-41C8-9E01-99063617A286 at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Tweeters,

>

> It can be easy to lump all little brown birds into a single category and think of them as being nearly identical. It turns out that even subtle differences can become obvious once you begin to see the birds for who they really are. Please look closely at the first photo in this week’s post. Then, before reading the rest of the story, determine if the bird is most closely related to a sparrow, swallow or robin?

>

> http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-little-brown-bird.html <http://unionbaywatch.blogspot.com/2016/10/a-little-brown-bird.html>

>

> Have a great day on Union Bay where nature lives in the city.

>

> Larry Hubbell

> ldhubbell at comcast dot net

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 2

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 16:32:03 -0400 (EDT)

> From: Keith Carlson <kec201814 at cableone.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Asotin county Lesser Black-backed Gull

> To: inland nw birders <inland-nw-birders at uidaho.edu>, TWEETERS

> tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <460665883.166853452.1477081923244.JavaMail.zimbra at cableone.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> This AM there was an adult cycle Lesser Black-backed Gull at the Asotin county Landfill.Was able to observe at fairly close range and compare with nearby adult California and Herring Gulls.https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/30388166161/in/dateposted-public/ Thought I saw a LBBG at Three Mile two weeks ago go but could not confirm as I did not have my scope and the legs were in the water. Keith E. CarlsonLewiston

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 13:56:47 -0700

> From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl at comcast.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Fwd: "Grizzly Morgan" - N. Cascades ecosystem

> To: Tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID: <169E0C01-CC5F-4675-8148-FA2C8E240115 at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

>> From: Barbara Deihl <barbdeihl at comcast.net>

>> Date: October 21, 2016 1:54:11 PM PDT

>> Subject: "Grizzly Morgan" - N. Cascades ecosystem

>>

>> Several national and local conservation/outdoor organizations sponsored an inspiring, eye-opening and entertaining event last evening (10/20) in Seattle, showcasing British-born, now Bellingham residing, ecologist/wildlife filmmaker, Chris Morgan and his continuing work on bears of the world, last night specifically focusing on situations and issues having to do with re-building numbers of grizzly bears in our North Cascades. The higher-altitude meadow ecosystem of the N. Cascades, favored by this kind of bear, has, in the past, included more than the 3 or so grizzlies that are left in an habitat that could readily build up again, to the benefit of plants, insects, fish, birds, and other mammals, including us humans. We will be hearing and seeing more about this bear project over the next ??? years. A new film about this is due to come out very soon, either in theaters or on PBS. Meanwhile, you might be interested in checking out some clips and other background informa!

> tion to be found on the following site: https://chrismorganwildlife.org/clips/

>>

>> Shamelessly promoting a healthy planet...

>>

>> Barb Deihl

>> Matthews Beach Neighborhood - NE Seattle

>> barbdeihl at comcast.net

>>

>

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 14:22:35 -0700 (Pacific Daylight Time)

> From: Tim Billo <timbillo at uw.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] western meadowlark in Seward Park

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID:

> <alpine.WNT.2.00.1610211417340.8784 at H8BR5J1_POE.clients.nebula2.washington.edu>

>

> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; format=flowed; charset=US-ASCII

>

> Juvenile western meadowlark on lawn at Andrew's Bay (Seward Park) October

> 20th.

>

> Peregrine falcon in same area, hunting unidentified shorebirds (no

> binoculars with me) about a week ago.

>

> This is also close to where the black-billed magpie has been hanging

> around (although I haven't seen that bird in at least a few weeks now).

>

> Cheers,

>

> Tim Billo

> _______________________________________________

> Timothy Billo, Ph.D.

> Lecturer

> Program on the Environment

> Box 355679

> University of Washington

> Seattle WA 98195-5679

> 206.407.4056

> http://timbillo.wordpress.com/

>

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 5

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 17:12:45 -0700

> From: Joshua Glant <josh.n.glant at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Shoreline Snow Bunting?

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <00EDBE0B-FE65-48AD-B572-4121D17A8D29 at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Hello Tweets,

>

> Just wondering if anyone in Tweeterdom has seen the snow bunting in Shoreline since the last report but hasn't put it in eBird! I know of one negative report off of eBird since the past weekend.

>

> Thanks, Joshua Glant

> Mercer Island, WA

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 19:01:39 -0700

> From: "hank.heiberg" <hank.heiberg at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Snoqualmie Valley Great Egret

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <0E8A80DB-0E84-44FB-9901-6DD506AEA94E at gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> Via a very circuitous route, Karen and I viewed a Great Egret in the Snoqualmie Valley this evening at 5:45 about 1/4 mile north of the stoplight at the intersection of NE 124th Street and West Snoqualmie Valley Road. It was on the east side of West Snoqualmie Valley Road in shallow flood waters. West Snoqualmie Valley Road is heavily travelled with no shoulder and cars going 50 mph so there is no stopping, but we pulled over at a driveway and waited until there was no traffic so that we could drive by the egret at a slightly slower speed.

>

> This morning a birder at Tolt-MacDonald park first told us that he had seen a Great Egret south of NE 124th hear the stoplight. We looked and couldn't find it. We later told Vickie Scales about it. She found it and e-mailed us. We went back and found it where she had seen it.

>

>

> Hank Heiberg

> Lake Joy

> Carnation, WA

> hankdotheibergatgmaildotcom

>

> Sent from my iPad

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 7

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 19:41:34 -0700

> From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz at earthlink.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Pend Orville Co scoters & Long-tailed Duck,

> Spokane Co. Scoter, Swamp Sparrow & Am. Tree Sparrow

> To: TWEETERS <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <51FAF52A-F71A-4E32-B26C-1FEE5CFFBEE2 at earthlink.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8

>

> Hi Tweeters -

> With the pelagic weathered out, I opted to head east for the weekend — “Scoter Quest 2016!” —

> I made it to Spokane in early afternoon, and after a good bit of peering from different angles, was able to find 2 SURF SCOTERS on the Pre-Mix Ponds where Jon I reported them. The scoters were hanging out with a group of Bufflehead, in the southwest corner of the ‘pond’ - best views were from the north edges.

>

> I headed next to Liberty Lake County Park in search of the recently reported Swamp Sparrow. While I waited at the marsh viewing platform through a shower, my playback brought in an AMERICAN TREE SPARROW of the fall. Eventually, the showers subsided and a nice juvie SWAMP SPARROW came in for good looks.

>

> Moving on to Diamond Lake in Pend Oreille County, I arrived w/ some daylight left and was happy to find the scoter show still in full swing, as Terry Little reported a couple of days ago - I counted over 15 SURF SCOTERS, but there could easily have still been the 20+ Terry reported - lots of diving going on. In addition, I had at least one WHITE-WINGED SCOTER show up. And best of all, a LONG-TAILED DUCK cruised by!

>

> Onwards to Stevens & Ferry tomorrow to try for more Scoter goodness…

>

> Matt Bartels

> Seattle, WA

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 8

> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2016 03:58:05 +0000

> From: Denis DeSilvis <avnacrs4birds at outlook.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Joint Base Lewis McChord (JBLM) Eagles Pride Golf

> Course monthly bird walk - 10-20-2016

> To: "'Tweeters'" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <SN2PR20MB079878E60E0E891FF25C34CBFCD70 at SN2PR20MB0798.namprd20.prod.outlook.com>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Tweeters,

>

> Wet, soggy, dripping - I don't know if we on this side of the mountains have enough descriptors for rain, but I might be looking for more. Sheesh. It was raining lightly at the start, and increased to a persistent, heavy rain within the first half-hour. Temp about 58degF. Four of us persevered, but we were all very soggy, despite having rain gear on, by the time we finished. (Kudos to Leah and Henry for showing up and slogging it out with the two of us that lead the trip.)

>

>

>

> The highlights, besides the 19 confirmed species, were the following:

>

> 1. 104 American Robins, including 85 on the fairway near the driving range. We had remarked earlier that we hadn't seen many robins, but as we ended the walk, we spotted the very large group near the driving range/3rd tee box and fairway.

>

> 2. Two separate flocks of Bushtits, one beside the 4th fairway and one on the road behind Hodge Lake. We're lucky to have one flock every couple of months.

>

> 3. A Common Raven -- not a usual suspect, but has been seen more often this year.

>

> 4. Nine Ring-necked Ducks on Hodge Lake and one on the maintenance pond.

>

> 5. Two Red-winged Blackbirds, one of which was singing, at the maintenance pond.

>

> 6. Three White-crowned Sparrows in the blackberry patch near the driving range.

>

>

>

> Not posted: We had what could have been a HERMIT THRUSH in the path through the wooded area between the 15th tee and 16th fairway. None of us got a definitive view, but the flight pattern through the shrub zone, size, and coloration fit this species rather than American Robin. (And definitely it wasn't a Spotted Towhee.) Given that the first sighting of this species on an Eagles Pride bird-walk was last month, not too far away in the wooded area near the 12th hole, this warrants keeping an eye out in the coming months.

>

>

>

> The JBLM Eagles Pride GC birders meet the third Thursday of each month at 8:00AM. Starting point is Bldg # 1514, Driving Range Tee, Eagles Pride Golf Course, I-5 Exit 116, Mounts Road Exit. Upcoming walks include the following:

>

> * November 17

>

> * December 15

>

> * January 19 (2017!)

>

> Anyone is welcome to join us!

>

>

>

> Species list for this month:

>

>

>

> Mallard 3 One at the maintenance pond and two at Hodge Lake.

>

> Ring-necked Duck 10 Nine at Hodge Lake and one at the maintenance pond.

>

> Hooded Merganser 1 Alighted on maintenance pond near Ring-necked Duck.

>

> Northern Flicker 2

>

> Steller's Jay 4

>

> Common Raven 1

>

> Chestnut-backed Chickadee 2

>

> Bushtit 25 Two separate flocks: one along 4th fairway and the other near road behind Hodge Lake.

>

> Pacific Wren 8

>

> Golden-crowned Kinglet 4

>

> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1

>

> American Robin 104

>

> Fox Sparrow 1

>

> Dark-eyed Junco 34

>

> White-crowned Sparrow 3

>

> Golden-crowned Sparrow 6

>

> Song Sparrow 4

>

> Red-winged Blackbird 2

>

> House Finch 2

>

> May all your birds be identified,

>

> Denis DeSilvis

> avnacrs 4 birds at outlook dot com

>

>

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>

> Message: 9

> Date: Fri, 21 Oct 2016 22:27:41 -0700

> From: dlmoor2 at coastaccess.com

> Subject: [Tweeters] ravens

> To: tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <1eb13efdad814e21d7a7a475d5872492 at coastaccess.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Hey Tweets...I found myself reading up on the Common Raven this past

> Tuesday and nodded knowingly when I read they are usually found in pairs

> or small groups, but can be seen in larger groups at winter roosts or

> feeding sites (garbage dumps).

>

> So imagine my surprise when we saw eight together at the base of the

> dunes just north of Ocean Shores this morning. That was the only group

> we saw but we found several pairs, including a pair very engrossed with

> one another in obvious courtship mode...almost felt like a voyeur!

>

> Easily the greatest number I have seen out here....total, 22.

>

> Dianna Moore

>

> Ocean Shores

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 10

> Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2016 11:42:24 -0700

> From: Jerry Swena <jswena3348 at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Green heron lewis co.

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID:

> <CAH4E7d92PVow1fwFFvJ31moFonrc9LOKbD6q+FGftfoidxOi8w at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> This morning I found a green heron roosting in the top of a tree, where the

> rail trail crosses HWY 603, near state HWY 6, over an old oxbow of the

> Chehalis river.

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