[Tweeters] Scrub Jay eats Chickadee

Mike Fite fitemf at gmail.com
Thu Jun 8 09:05:12 PDT 2017


Hello Tweets,
Several years ago I saw in my yard a Blue Jay fly by with a Carolina Wren’s fledgling in its mouth.
Fish Crows readily raid the nests of other birds here. This behavior seems to be typical of family Corvidae .

> On Jun 7, 2017, at 3:00 PM, tweeters-request at mailman1.u.washington.edu wrote:

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> Today's Topics:

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> 1. Fobes Hill (Snohomish Co) House Wren's (Josh Adams)

> 2. Renton Boeing Falcon. (mark girling)

> 3. RE: Fobes Hill (Snohomish Co) House Wren's (Betty )

> 4. need a good documentary on owls (Theresa Simendinger)

> 5. Great Horned Owl Ruckus (Dayna yalowicki)

> 6. Re: Scrub Jay eats a bird (JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO)

> 7. 14 American White Pelicans at UW Seattle Campus (Tim Billo)

> 8. Burrowing owls of e wa (tredick christina)

>

>

> ----------------------------------------------------------------------

>

> Message: 1

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 14:53:18 -0700

> From: Josh Adams <xjoshx at gmail.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Fobes Hill (Snohomish Co) House Wren's

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <CAFOenNEMwo=qRcbh3ezVNCHbfTU8AM=MPfXX5rK_+H+T-O432Q at mail.gmail.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

>

> Hello Tweets,

> House Wren has been a pretty uncommon bird in Snohomish county,

> traditionally. WABirder checklists list it as a 3 (harder to find,

> usually seen annually) which is its status in most western Washington

> counties. Typically it is found on the margins of the county in places

> like Darrington, Stanwood, and in clearcuts around foothills of the

> cascades. Last year Dave Slager found a singing male on his breeding

> bird survey route near Fobes road in northeast Snohomish, which at the

> time seemed like a fairly random, but appreciated, deviation from the

> norm.

>

> In mid-May of this year after a successful trip to Fobes Rd looking

> for the first Eastern Kingbirds of the season, I happened upon a

> singing House Wren a few miles from Dave's sighting last year. Last

> week I drove the area again and found at least two more singing males.

> Dave found another on his BBS route last Saturday, and this morning I

> found yet another. So as of today there are five singing males on

> territory in this area. Given that my survey method of driving around

> slowly with my windows open will only find males that happen to be

> singing close enough to the road to be heard within a fairly small

> window, I suspect this may only be a small sample of the birds

> present. Presumably there are females present as well.

>

> It'll be curious to see if this species maintains or increases its

> foothold in the next few years,

>

> I also found a couple Lazuli's singing, which seem to be another

> uncommon species with a fairly good foothold in this area.

>

> Josh Adams

> Cathcart, WA

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 2

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 23:14:10 +0000 (UTC)

> From: mark girling <markgirling at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Renton Boeing Falcon.

> To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <329906444.4474690.1496790850103 at mail.yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Observed one of our resident Peregrins taking a ride on an overhead crane. Saw the bird settle on one of the cranes safety railings. I figured as soon as the crane moves then the bird would fly off. Nope. Just sat there and enjoyed the ride. Even when the crane cab came past the bird It remained happy to sit on the railing giving the crane operator great looks. If only we were allowed cameras.

> Senit from Yahoo Mail on Android

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> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 3

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 16:30:03 -0700

> From: "Betty " <bettinab39 at yahoo.com>

> Subject: RE: [Tweeters] Fobes Hill (Snohomish Co) House Wren's

> To: "'Josh Adams'" <xjoshx at gmail.com>, "'Tweeters'"

> <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <000b01d2df1c$d3a993b0$7afcbb10$@yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> I am a ways from Snohomish county. I am in Chimacum, Jefferson county. I have a house wren nesting in one of my bird houses!

> First time I have had one in the 26 years that I have been here.

> Betty

> Chimacum Wa.

>

> -----Original Message-----

> From: tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu [mailto:tweeters-bounces at mailman1.u.washington.edu] On Behalf Of Josh Adams

> Sent: Tuesday, June 06, 2017 2:53 PM

> To: Tweeters <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Fobes Hill (Snohomish Co) House Wren's

>

> Hello Tweets,

> House Wren has been a pretty uncommon bird in Snohomish county, traditionally. WABirder checklists list it as a 3 (harder to find, usually seen annually) which is its status in most western Washington counties. Typically it is found on the margins of the county in places like Darrington, Stanwood, and in clearcuts around foothills of the cascades. Last year Dave Slager found a singing male on his breeding bird survey route near Fobes road in northeast Snohomish, which at the time seemed like a fairly random, but appreciated, deviation from the norm.

>

> In mid-May of this year after a successful trip to Fobes Rd looking for the first Eastern Kingbirds of the season, I happened upon a singing House Wren a few miles from Dave's sighting last year. Last week I drove the area again and found at least two more singing males.

> Dave found another on his BBS route last Saturday, and this morning I found yet another. So as of today there are five singing males on territory in this area. Given that my survey method of driving around slowly with my windows open will only find males that happen to be singing close enough to the road to be heard within a fairly small window, I suspect this may only be a small sample of the birds present. Presumably there are females present as well.

>

> It'll be curious to see if this species maintains or increases its foothold in the next few years,

>

> I also found a couple Lazuli's singing, which seem to be another uncommon species with a fairly good foothold in this area.

>

> Josh Adams

> Cathcart, WA

> _______________________________________________

> Tweeters mailing list

> Tweeters at u.washington.edu

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>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 4

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 17:49:42 -0700

> From: Theresa Simendinger <cowgirltns at rockisland.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] need a good documentary on owls

> To: Tweeters at mailman1.u.washington.edu

> Message-ID: <DE344C34-C880-4833-862D-0237291B2A3A at rockisland.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

>

> Hello Bird Fans:

> Does anyone know of a good documentary film on Owls?

> or flying night creatures…Owls, bats

>

>

> Theresa Simendinger • 655 Kingfisher Lane Friday Harbor • WA 98250 • 360-378-8332• 415-717-0546

>

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>

> Message: 5

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 18:05:13 -0700

> From: Dayna yalowicki <dlwicki at comcast.net>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Great Horned Owl Ruckus

> To: tweeters at u.washington.edu

> Message-ID: <F2E2CEBB-2A3F-4F3A-AF26-3AB6F19FAB3A at comcast.net>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

>

> A Great Horned Owl is sitting in a tree in some woods by my house and crows have been harassing it since 6:30 this morning, never letting up, squawking and dive bombing all day, it's now 6:00 p.m. Is the time length of this harassment normal? Just wondering if he might be injured and unable to fly away.

>

> Dayna Yalowicki

> Bothell, Wa

>

> Buy Free Range

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 6

> Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2017 02:14:26 +0000

> From: "JERRY D AND MARCENE D'ADDIO" <jmdaddio at msn.com>

> Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay eats a bird

> To: D R <somegum2 at hotmail.com>, "tweeters at u.washington.edu"

> <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID:

> <MWHPR17MB1677755F9AA9ABC3CDA20C9BC1C80 at MWHPR17MB1677.namprd17.prod.outlook.com>

>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>

> Here's one for the Chickadees... This morning from inside my house I saw a moth trapped between my window and screen. I went outside through my back door, removed the screen, and the moth quickly flew out, zipped away to the north. I came back inside. About 15 minutes later my husband, Jerry, walks up to the same back door and says "Who's this?" Evidently the moth had zipped into the house and sort of collapsed on the floor. Jerry picked up the moth and gently gave the moth flight back into the yard. As the moth was just taking wing a chickadee swooped in and nailed the moth. The chickadee landed in a rhododendron with the moth. Over the past several days we have had chickadee parents, both Chestnut-backed and Black-capped feeding their young in the trees around our feeders. One lucky chickadee family shared the unlucky moth.

>

> -Marcy D'Addio

> Redmond, WA

> _____________________________

> From: D R <somegum2 at hotmail.com<mailto:somegum2 at hotmail.com>>

> Sent: Tuesday, June 6, 2017 9:26 AM

> Subject: [Tweeters] Scrub Jay eats a bird

> To: <tweeters at u.washington.edu<mailto:tweeters at u.washington.edu>>

>

>

> Hi Tweets.

> I was walking with my dog here in Wallingford when a scrub jay flew past carrying something. He landed in a low tree and I saw that he held a dead chickadee! I watched him pulling off feathers. At one point the chickadee's head broke off. The jay had one foot on a branch and one foot holding the chickadee body and the head in his beak. I wondered what he would do next: eat the head whole? Drop the head to continue working on the body? I guess I shouldn't have been surprised when he leaned over and tucked the head into the crook of a branch. Satisfied that the head was not going anywhere, he turned his attention back to the body. Yummy red stuff in there! The bird flew off but retuned later for the head which it carried away.

> Dave Robichaud

> Wallingford _______________________________________________

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> Message: 7

> Date: Tue, 6 Jun 2017 21:39:12 -0700 (PDT)

> From: Tim Billo <timbillo at uw.edu>

> Subject: [Tweeters] 14 American White Pelicans at UW Seattle Campus

> To: tweeters at uw.edu

> Message-ID:

> <alpine.LRH.2.01.1706062137320.28502 at homer12.u.washington.edu>

> Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; format=flowed; charset=US-ASCII

>

> 14 American white pelicans soaring over UW Seattle campus and Lake Union,

> June 6th 12PM.

>

>

>

> _______________________________________________

> Timothy Billo, Ph.D.

> Lecturer

> Program on the Environment

> Box 355679

> University of Washington

> Seattle WA 98195-5679

> 206.407.4056

> http://timbillo.wordpress.com/

>

>

> ------------------------------

>

> Message: 8

> Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2017 15:16:50 +0000 (UTC)

> From: tredick christina <cjt37 at yahoo.com>

> Subject: [Tweeters] Burrowing owls of e wa

> To: "tweeters at u.washington.edu" <tweeters at u.washington.edu>

> Message-ID: <194237061.4518558.1496848610384 at mail.yahoo.com>

> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

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>

> Hi tweeters I am planning a trip over to e wa and would like directions to the burrowing owlsHope you have a lovely birding dayChristina Woodinville

> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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