[Tweeters] Nisqually NWR Wednesday Walk for 9/6/17

Shep Thorp shepthorp at gmail.com
Thu Sep 7 11:45:34 PDT 2017


Hi Tweets,

well, we had a smoke and ash overcast day with temperatures in the 70's and
80's degrees Fahrenheit with a Low 0.17ft Tide at 12:28pm. The poor air
quality, muggy temperatures, immense mud flats with the low tide, and
summer doldrums provided an apocalyptic feel for the day. We suspect the
fires on North Peak Mount Rainier and Mount Jolly in Cle Elum, along with
other forest fires in eastern Washington and Oregon, have contributed to
the smoke and ash. I could not stay for the entire day so Jon Anderson
helped with the dike, boardwalk and Nisqually Overlook. We only had 51
species for the day with highlights including GREEN HERON, RED-BREASTED
SAPSUCKER, SWAINSON'S THRUSH, AMERICAN PIPITS, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER, and
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER.

With the Swallow-tailed Gull recently reported at Point Wells, Snohomish
County north of Richmond Beach, as recently as Tuesday September 5th, we
had a couple of bird watchers from out of town join us hoping to see some
of our regular birds.

Starting out at the Visitor Center Pond Overlook at 8am, we had good looks
of WOOD DUCK, HOODED MERGANSER, AMERICAN COOT, NORTHERN FLICKER, and
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD.

AMERICAN PIPIT and another flock of SAVANNAH SPARROW are moving through
with good sightings both on the fields south of the Twin Barns and out on
the dike. The Refuge has started mowing fields in preparation of
intentional spring fed flooding for the wintering waterfowl.

Along the west side of the Twin Barns Loop Trail we had high counts of
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, all gender and age varieties, vocalizing with a "chew"
call note. Many Savannah Sparrow were high in Willow Trees along the edge
habitat. RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER was a life bird for some of our out of
town birders. We had good looks of WILLOW FLYCATCHER, BROWN CREEPER,
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE, ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER,
SONG SPARROW, SPOTTED TOWHEE, juvenile WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW and AMERICAN
GOLDFINCH. Last week we did not see SWAINSON'S THRUSH, but we picked up
two about 70 feet high in our single Douglas Fir Tree or "Peregrine Tree"
in the middle of the riparian habitat.

The Twin Barns Overlook was slow with a few MALLARD, BARN SWALLOW and
DARK-EYED JUNCO, and additional looks at previously seen species.

Out on the dike or Nisqually Estuary Trail TREE/VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, more
American Pipit, were added to the list. On the tidal side NORTHERN
PINTAIL, GREAT BLUE HERON, COOPER'S HAWK, BALD EAGLE, RING-BILLED GULL,
AMERICAN KESTREL, PEREGRINE FALCON. On the fresh water side we observed
NORTHERN SHOVELER, VIRGINIA RAIL, GREEN HERON - best seen August and
September at Nisqually, and WILSON'S SNIPE.

On the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail, Jon Anderson and the intrepids,
picked up DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, WESTERN GULL,
GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL, WESTERN X GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULL HYBRID or Olympic
Gull, BELTED KINGFISHER, and COMMON RAVEN.

During our return along the north and east side of the Twin Barns Loop
Trail, and including the Nisqually Overlook, we added ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRD,
BUSHTIT, BEWICK'S WREN, and female BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER.

51 species for the day, with 154 species for the year thus far. Notably,
we are lacking sightings on varieties of shorebirds, owls and salt water
birds which usually help get us closer to 170.

Mammals seen included Mink and Eastern Gray Squirrel.

I believe they still have plans to replace the bridge just south of the
photo blind on the Nisqually Estuary Boardwalk Trail, pending permits, so
there will likely be two closures this Fall on the boardwalk - 1)
maintenance - variable; 2) hunting season - after the middle of October.

Until next week when Phil will return to lead the walk, good birding!

Shep

--
Shep Thorp
Browns Point
253-370-3742
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