[Tweeters] Some Birding Resources

J Christian Kessler 1northraven at gmail.com
Tue Sep 12 16:12:04 PDT 2017


Jane --
this looks like a lot of research & collation. Very helpful for many of
us, in particular those of us who started birding (in elementary school)
when computers were the size of garages & full of tubes, & had nothing to
do with us. Your guidance in moving me towards the technologies of the
current decade is fun & much appreciated.

Chris Kessler
Seattle



On Mon, Sep 11, 2017 at 2:49 PM, Jane Hadley <hadleyj1725 at gmail.com> wrote:


> Welcome, Peggy Mundy, to Tweeters! Peggy mentioned that she looks forward

> to learning about birding resources from Tweeters.

>

> A year or two ago, I put together a list of birding resources for another

> project and thought I would update the list and share it here for those who

> might be interested.

>

> 1. eBird – A major database where birders enter their sightings and

> photos. The data is available to be used by scientists and other birders.

> This Cornell University Lab of Ornithology database provides a wealth of

> information about sightings, seasonal occurrence and geographical

> distribution of species.

>

>

> Go to: http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/topics/

> 439564-getting-started/articles

>

>

> There is a Pacific Northwest version of eBird with Northwest-specific

> articles and other content, including opportunities to participate in

> citizen science projects.

>

> Go to: http://ebird.org/content/nw/

>

>

> 2. Birder's Dashboard - This is a non-commercial, user-friendly website

> (with desktop and mobile or cell phone versions) that shows recent

> sightings reported to eBird. You can see notable sightings in a state,

> sightings by county, sightings near any spot you click on on a map,

> sightings of a particular species you select, or sightings at designated

> hotspots in the state or province you select. There is a Washington State

> and a US/Canada version.

>

> The Washington State version allows you to get sightings for the whole

> state or for any of the 39 counties you select.

>

> Go to: http://birdingwashington.info/dashboard/wa/

>

>

> For the United States and Canada version, select a state or a province to

> look for recent sightings.

>

> Go to: http://birdingwashington.info/dashboard/

>

>

> Click on the “Mobile” button to see the mobile or cell phone version.

>

>

> 3. A Birder's Guide to Washington, Second Edition - This is a 613-page

> guide to the best birding sites throughout the state with information about

> how to get there (including maps), the habitat, the climate, the birds,

> etc. The guide also includes bar graphs for all annually occurring birds,

> showing their seasonal abundance in both Eastern and Western Washington, as

> well as an annotated checklist of the 510 species seen in Washington as of

> 2015.

>

>

> The content of this book was placed online this year so that it can be

> updated with current information. You can either buy the book (Seattle

> Audubon's Nature Store, Buteo Books, Amazon.com, Powell Books, etc.) or you

> can view it online at http://wabirdguide.org

>

>

> This website is a good place to check for current information before you

> head out to a birding spot.

>

>

> 4. Seattle Audubon's BirdWeb - This is a fount of information about bird

> species found in the state. It gives a description of each species that

> helps with ID, range map for that species, song recordings, and information

> about habitat, behavior, diet, conservation, and occurrence in Washington

> by location and season.

>

> Go to: http://birdweb.org

>

>

> 5. The official state checklist - The checklist (515 species as of October

> 2016) of all the species ever seen in the state is available on the WOS

> website in either Excel format or as a one-page printable document.

>

> Go to: http://wos.org/records/checklist/

>

>

> 6. Washington Ornithological Society (WOS) - WOS was chartered in 1988 to

> increase knowledge of the birds of Washington and to enhance communication

> among all persons interested in those birds.

>

>

> WOS provides a forum for birders from throughout the state to meet and

> share information on bird identification, biology, population status, and

> birding sites. Over 400 enthusiastic birders— from backyard feeder watchers

> to professional ornithologists—belong to WOS. Membership is open to all

> persons interested in birds and birding.

>

>

> The WOS website offers a variety of resources, including official

> checklists, an online form for reporting rare sightings, announcement of

> field trips and speakers for monthly meetings, descriptions of some key

> birding sites around the state, a listing of Christmas Bird Counts around

> the state, descriptions of bird research projects, downloadable copies of

> articles in WOS's scholarly journal (Washington Birds), and ability to

> search 27 years of newsletters (which includes Washington Field Notes).

>

>

> Go to: http://wos.org

>

>

> 7. Audubon Washington's Great Washington State Birding Trail maps -

> Available either as glossy color brochures, which can be purchased for

> $4.95 from Seattle Audubon Nature Shop, as a free downloadable .pdf, or as

> a phone app for $9.99. These maps show the location of key birding spots in

> seven different regions of the state.

>

>

> Go to: http://wa.audubon.org/birds/great-washington-state-birding-trail

>

>

> Scroll down and find the region you're interested in and then click on the

> "Read more" link. When you get to that page, click on the blue link at the

> beginning of the text, giving the name of the region. It will take you to a

> downloadable .pdf of the map.

>

>

> 8. County checklists - Available at the Washington Birder website,

> headquarters for birders who list sightings by county. The one-page,

> printable checklists show abundance codes (the parentheses after the

> species name) for each species found in that county. Code 1 is the most

> common, while Code 5 is a bird that has fewer than five sightings in the

> county.

>

>

> Go to http://www.wabirder.com/county_map_pages.html

>

>

> 9. Local Audubon chapters - Many chapters offer regular field trips for

> beginners and intermediate birders and classes. Seattle Audubon offers the

> advanced Master Birder class.

>

>

> To find a chapter near you, go to http://wa.audubon.org/chapters-centers,

> click on the + sign in the upper left corner of the map to blow up the map

> and find a red dot near you. Click on the red dot to get the name and more

> information of the chapter.

>

>

> 10. Other links:

>

>

> + Magnuson Park Geography https://goo.gl/SJIWy1

>

> + Montlake Fill map (possibly not current because of SR-520 "mitigation")

> http://goo.gl/fRXGMm

>

> + Gull Identification (look at right-side column for links)

> http://goo.gl/LXbZBe

>

> + Dennis Paulson's Wing Photos Page http://goo.gl/tniWoa

>

> + Birdsongs http://www.xeno-canto.org/

>

> + SORA (Searchable Ornithological Research Archive) https://sora.unm.edu/

>

> + All about bird anatomy https://goo.gl/exzh2q

>

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>

>



--
"moderation in everything, including moderation"
Rustin Thompson
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